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'Grange Hill' Creator Wants To Bring The BBC Series Back With The Original Cast

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'Grange Hill' Creator Wants To Bring The BBC Series Back With The Original Cast

From Spice Girls to Gavin & Stacey, 2019 truly is shaping up to be the year of the comeback.

And nostalgia is running riot again as the creator of Grange Hill has revealed that he wants to bring the BBC series back to our screens - with a 21st century revamp.

The show ran from 1978 until 2008 and featured ground-breaking storylines, particularly in the 1980s when it was most popular, including the Just Say No drugs campaign, which saw the cast visit the White House.

Georgia May Foote starred in the long-running teen series. (Credit: BBC)
Georgia May Foote starred in the long-running teen series. (Credit: BBC)
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The series was a launchpad for many British stars including Georgia May Foote, Sean Maguire, Todd Carty.

And now Show runner Phil Redmond insisted that the show could still have an impact and suggested that the former cast could be reintroduced as parents of the new generation of school goers.

Speaking to the Radio Times, he said: "The impact would be even greater today. It could have fallen into Ofsted special measures and be threatened with closure.

Lee MacDonald played Sammy 'Zammo' McGuire on the show during the 1980s. (Credit: BBC)
Lee MacDonald played Sammy 'Zammo' McGuire on the show during the 1980s. (Credit: BBC)
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"But a few of the old characters, who are now parents, or even grandparents, come together to save it as a community school. Zammo could lead the campaign, remembering how his friends at school brought him back from the brink."

Phil added that an updated series would tackle difficult subjects including knife crime, gang violence and homophobia, as well as the school strikes for the climate emergency as he insisted there's a gap in programming for teens.

He added: "All of them, plus Extinction Rebellion and the cult of Greta Thunberg. But underscoring them would be the root causes like self-worth, bullying, loneliness and isolation. Now, though, they'd be illustrated through the pressures of social media.

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"I still feel the BBC made a strategic mistake in overlooking those aged nine to 16 when it revamped the schedules a few years ago. That age group, the rites-of-passage audience, isn't well served by TV."

Featured Image Credit: BBC

Topics: BBC, TV News, TV Entertainment

Lisa McLoughlin
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