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People are 'disturbed' after watching women being 'assaulted' on Netflix docuseries

Gregory Robinson

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People are 'disturbed' after watching women being 'assaulted' on Netflix docuseries

Featured Image Credit: Netflix

**Trigger warning: This article discusses rape and sexual assault**

Viewers have been left feeling disturbed by accounts and allegations of rape and sexual assault in a new Netflix docuseries. Watch the trailer below:

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Trainwreck: Woodstock ’99 recounts the infamous music event that took place 30 years after the pivotal 1969 festival.

While the original Woodstock was a key moment in hippie anti-war counterculture, the 1999 revival quickly descended into a violent and fiery mess.

There were four reported cases of rape and many reported cases of sexual assault which are mentioned in the three-part documentary series.

One woman named Heather, who was 14 when she attended the festival, recounted being groped while crowd-surfing.

“There were people who were legit trying to carry you as they’re supposed to be, but there’s equally as many dudes, like, grabbing your boob and getting a squeeze on your butt as they’re passing you along and, you know, I was young, I was 14, like I had never had those kind of hand in those places," she said.

In another shocking interview, stage manager AJ Srybnik said he found a naked a young girl who was unconscious and next to her was a boy pulling his trousers back on.

The festival descended into chaos. Credit: Netflix
The festival descended into chaos. Credit: Netflix

“I was floored,” he reflected on the shocking moment. “It literally took the life out of me.” 

One viewer shared: “If you're planning on watching that Netflix doc about Woodstock ‘99, be warned there's imagery that could be potentially triggering for sexual assault survivors.”

Reacting to the organisers’ response to the reports of sexual assault, one viewer wrote: “The attitude towards the multitude of sexual assault allegations at #Woodstock99 from the men in charge of is nothing short of foul.”

While another called the documentary ‘fantastic’ they said the accounts of sexual assault left them feeling ‘angry’.

They tweeted: “Watched the @netflix documentary on #Woodstock99 and dear God, the amount of victim blaming and turning a blind eye to the abuse and assault of women made me so angry.

"Fantastic documentary about a festival that could have been so amazing, but greed ruined it, like most things.”

A fourth person said they were ‘gobsmacked’ in response to the documentary. “This documentary left me gobsmacked. People’s lives were ruined by the sexual assault and physical abuse that occurred at that festival,” they wrote.

“I don’t even want to mention substance abuse in that mess #Woodstock99.”

Echoing other viewers’ anger at victim blaming towards the women who removed their tops during the festival, one Twitter user shared: “That #woodstock99 on Netflix was wild. Those dudes just wanted to make money, and for them to say they didn’t know women were assaulted…and for anyone saying “well the women were topless” still doesn’t give those men the right to assault anyone.”

The documentary series has shocked viewers. Credit: Netflix
The documentary series has shocked viewers. Credit: Netflix

Promoter John Sher has also received criticism for comments made in the documentary about the festival’s four reported rapes.

“Woodstock was like a small city, you know?” he says in the last episode of the docuseries. 

“All things considered, I’d say that there would probably be as many or more rapes in any sized city of that… but it wasn’t anything that gained enough momentum so that it caused any on-site issues, other than, of course, the women it happened to."

One outraged viewer called Sher’s comments ‘baffling’ in a tweet: "I think Michael Lang and John Scher's inability to take responsibility for the conditions during Woodstock '99 is a great example of how hippy boomers sold out their 'peace and love' to uninhibited capitalism.

"They really think they did nothing wrong it's baffling."

Trainwreck: Woodstock ’99 is available to stream on Netflix now.

Topics: TV And Film, Netflix

Gregory Robinson
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