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How To Cut Your Own Hair When You're Stuck At Home

How To Cut Your Own Hair When You're Stuck At Home

While the country is in the grips of coronavirus, the last thing you may be worrying about is your split end situation, but that doesn't mean you need to neglect your hair, either.

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With the government advising against all non-essential contact, many hair salons are closing in the wake. So what do we do when we need a trim? Do we - *gulp* - cut it ourselves?

For many, the idea of cutting your hair at home may bring back memories of your mum conducting 90s bowl cuts on your brothers or induce PTSD of that time your friend performed an unsalvageable hack job on your fringe as a teenager - but home hair cuts needn't be scary.

Provided you're just after a trim (and not an entire restyle - let's not get carried away here), cutting your hair at home is doable in self-isolation.

Tyla tapped celebrity hairstylist Emily Chaplin for the know-how on cutting your hair at home for four different hair types.

Straight hair

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You should tread with caution when home cutting straight hair (Credit: Unsplash)
You should tread with caution when home cutting straight hair (Credit: Unsplash)

Emily, who has tended to the locks of stars from Courtney Love to Amanda Holden, warns that straight will be the hardest to cut.

This is because scissor-happy mishaps can be disguised on wavy or curly hair types - but the same can't be said for poker straight tresses, so tread with caution.

Begin by getting your straight hair as straight as can be, and parted correctly. "Use a hairdryer or straighteners to make sure your hair is super straight, then section your hair in half in a straight parting all the way from your forehead to your nape," Emily says.

"The best way to go about cutting straight hair is to point cut into the hair as opposed to cutting blunt lines," she advises. Point cutting is where you cut into the hair from an off-vertical angle, instead of horizontally.

"You'll find that this takes the weight out of your hair and leaves it looking softer through the ends instead of blunt. It also means that you can be a bit more scissor happy on those damaged sections where the split ends seem to be clustered together."

Emily adds: "For shorter hair types you could steal your boyfriend's beard trimmers and knock the ends of the hair off so you get a nice sharp line."

Wavy hair

Make sure you have a mirror to hand for cutting wavy hair (Credit: Unsplash)
Make sure you have a mirror to hand for cutting wavy hair (Credit: Unsplash)

For wavy hair, Emily suggests you should begin by "wetting the hair down and part into two sections same as before."

Next, "make sure each section is combed down from the root and pull it over your shoulders before cutting."

Making sure you have a mirror at head level, so you are keeping your head straight and not looking down, "cut a straight line using your fingers to keep the tension on the section".

For cutting your fringe, Emily suggests blowdrying it smooth and straightening it beforehand. "Get yourself a comb and comb through the fringe stopping at where you want to cut it.

"Use the comb as a guide, and starting in the middle of the comb, place your scissors slightly below it and cut across following the comb."

Curly hair

Wet your curly hair before taking the scissors to it (Credit: Unsplash)
Wet your curly hair before taking the scissors to it (Credit: Unsplash)

"Curly hair is easier as your mistakes aren't so visible," says Emily.

Start by wetting the hair so it's easier to comb through (dry curly hair has a tendency to get knotty). "Remember to only take small amounts of hair off as curly hair springs up when it dries, something curly-haired people will know all too well!," the hairstylist adds.

"When you have layers, split the hair into two sections in a centre parting. Take sections starting from the back, picking up the layers and nibbling the ends off," says Emily.

"Continue to take small sections either side, working your way towards the front so that you know each side is fairly balanced and even."

Afro hair

Cutting your afro hair is all about slow shaping (Credit: Unsplash)
Cutting your afro hair is all about slow shaping (Credit: Unsplash)

"Afro hair is visual, and there aren't any rules as such," says Emily. "Set up in front of a mirror and see if you can find another mirror in your house to put on a chair behind you so that you can see the back of your head."

She adds: "Slowly cut small pieces at a time until you've created the visual shape that you desire."

Happy home haircutting, guys!

Featured Image Credit: Shutterstock

Topics: Beauty, Hair, Style

Ciara Sheppard

Ciara is a freelance writer working for Tyla. After graduating with an English Lit and Media degree from the University of Sussex, Ciara held jobs at GLAMOUR and Yahoo Style before packing up for a solo travelling trip around South America.

 

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