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​People Who Take Naps Are More Productive, New Study Finds

​People Who Take Naps Are More Productive, New Study Finds

In news we've all been waiting for, having a quick snooze during the day can actually make us more productive, according to a new study.

The study, compiled by market research specialists OnePoll for Mattress Nerd, found that having some shut-eye during the day can actually be beneficial to our productivity at work and for our wellbeing too.

The survey, which asked 2,000 Americans all about their napping habits, came up with some interesting results.

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Those of us who self-identify as a napper (yes, it's a thing!), shared a number of positive attributes and were 93 per cent productive, a significant amount more than people who didn't usually take a nap during the day.

In fact, only 63 per cent of non-nappers said they felt productive.

93 per cent of nappers said they felt more productive after a quick snooze (Credit: Piqsels)
93 per cent of nappers said they felt more productive after a quick snooze (Credit: Piqsels)

Nappers are also more career-driven than those who don't take naps during the day. While 78 per cent of nappers said they were more focused on work after a snooze, only 55 per cent of non-nappers could say the same.

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And 83 per cent of nappers also reported a good work-life balance, in contrast to 62 per cent of non-nappers.

Furthermore, after a quick sleep, we're also more confident and happier too, it seems.

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A staggering 90 per cent of nappers identified as happy and 89 per cent said they were more confident as well.

While not all of us can adapt well to a nap during the daytime, most of the people surveyed said they felt either relaxed, happy or energised after a sleep.

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However, 15 per cent of people said they felt confused after a nap, while 12 per cent felt groggy.

Perhaps most surprisingly, however, 55 per cent of those polled said they'd be happy to take a pay cut if it meant they could have a nap at their desks. That's dedication to napping!

Over half of those polled said they'd take a pay cut at work if they could take a nap at their desks (Credit: Pexels)
Over half of those polled said they'd take a pay cut at work if they could take a nap at their desks (Credit: Pexels)

So what is the ultimate way to nap? According to the results, nappers who feel positive after a quick snooze limit their naps to around 15 minutes max.

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The prime time to take a nap, the survey also found, is exactly 1.31pm and the perfect temperature is 65 degrees.

A spokesperson for Mattress Nerd said: "Otherwise, those feelings of happiness, energy and relaxation could quickly turn into sleep inertia, causing confusion, grogginess, and disorientation, according to this study."

"Those on the pro side of the napping debate are serious about their siestas," the spokesperson added, "Our results found that 79 per cent of nappers are so dedicated to their naps that they consider it a hobby of theirs."

So now we know!

Featured Image Credit: PxHere

Topics: Life News, Health

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Aneira Davies

Aneira Davies is a freelance lifestyle journalist with a particular interest in interiors and craft. She has written for the Evening Standard, Prima, House Beautiful and Good Housekeeping.