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Doctor Explains Rare C-Section Birth

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Doctor Explains Rare C-Section Birth

**Warning: contains graphic images**

A doctor has explained the work that goes into performing an 'en caul birth' - one of the most rare, yet miraculous forms of child-birth.

The en caul birth, also known as a 'veiled birth', only occurs less than one in every 80,000 births, and many delivery doctors can go their entire careers without witnessing it.

Dr Ignacio Perez Tomasone, who has performed a number of these c-sections, has explained the inner workings of the magical birthing process. Watch here:

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The obstetrician-gynecologist from Buenos Aires, Argentina claims, across both public and private hospitals, less than eight percent of his deliveries are en caul births.

An en caul birth happens when a baby leaves their mother's womb while still inside an intact amniotic sac.

During a typical birth, the amniotic sac would rupture right as a mother is about to go into labour - aka: her water breaks.

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However, in some unusual instances, a baby can be born with the amniotic sac still in tact, making a newborn look like they have been delivered in a jelly-like bubble.

This can happen through both a vaginal delivery and a c-section, but they're slightly more likely through the latter.

During a cesarean section, a delivery doctor will typically go through the amniotic sac to get to the baby.

Dr Ignacio Perez Tomasone performs this rare c-section in just 8% of his deliveries. Credit: Instagram/@nachoptomasone
Dr Ignacio Perez Tomasone performs this rare c-section in just 8% of his deliveries. Credit: Instagram/@nachoptomasone
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But in certain instances, a doctor can lift out the baby while still in its amniotic sac - a practice that Dr Ignacio has experience with.

During a standard c-section, there are several different layers that a doctor has to open on the woman's body.

Once the incision reaches the uterus, Dr Ignacio assesses the membrane around the amniotic sac. He then opens a layer of muscle around the uterus to check the position of the placenta and make sure that it isn't starting to pull away.

If everything is looking right during these checks, the doctor acts quickly to deliver the baby in its amniotic sac before the placenta begins to detach - once it detaches, the baby has to be able to breathe on its own.

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The process is so rare that some doctors never experience it in their entire career. Credit: Instagram/@nachoptomasone
The process is so rare that some doctors never experience it in their entire career. Credit: Instagram/@nachoptomasone

Once the baby has been delivered in its sac, Dr Ignacio will wait a few minutes, then clamp the baby's umbilical cord to ensure it receives any final pulses of blood for an extra boost of iron. Finally, the baby can be passed to their mother.

Speaking on the process, Dr Ignacio said: "It's difficult to explain, but it is always very satisfying and always and emotional moment. Yes, it is wonderful to be there with the family. It's one of the best, most important moments in these people's lives."

Featured Image Credit: Dr Ignacio Perez Tomasone

Topics: Health, Parenting

Ali Condon
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