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Line Of Duty Sparks Surge In Applications For Real-Life AC12 Catching 'Bent Coppers'

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Line Of Duty Sparks Surge In Applications For Real-Life AC12 Catching 'Bent Coppers'

Line of Duty is back on our screens to make our Sunday nights a lot more exciting and we're already obsessed with trying to figure out who the 'bent coppers' are.

And while our WhatsApp groups have been kicking off with countless theories, some Line of Duty fans have taken their detective work one step further and fancy themselves as the next Steve Arnott (Martin Compston).

It's been revealed that applications to join the Met Police's real life equivalent to AC-12 has increased dramatically over the past three years - tripling since 2018.

Line Of Duty Sparks Surge In Applications For Real-Life AC12 Catching 'Bent Coppers' (Credit: BBC)
Line Of Duty Sparks Surge In Applications For Real-Life AC12 Catching 'Bent Coppers' (Credit: BBC)
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In 2017, due to popularity, the intense police drama moved from BBC Two to BBC One with viewers hitting 9.55million.

The Directorate of Professional Standards - similar to the fictional AC-12 - had 387 applicants in 2018, up from 96 the year before.

And this momentum remained high, with 340 applications in 2019 and a further 354 the following year after the fifth series hit our screens.

Line of Duty returned on Sunday with new character Detective Chief Inspector Joanne Davidson (Credit: BBC)
Line of Duty returned on Sunday with new character Detective Chief Inspector Joanne Davidson (Credit: BBC)
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We're currently hooked on Series 6 of the police drama, following the anti-corruption squad Steve Arnott and Ted Hastings (Adrian Dunbar) as they investigate some suspicious behaviour from Detective Chief Inspector Joanne Davidson (Kelly Macdonald).

There are already many theories floating around Twitter, although the drama, written by Jed Mercurio, never fails to surprise us with dramatic twists and turns.

According to The Sun, figures also show that police officers have been behaving themselves a lot more as the show's popularity has increased too.

Back in 2015-2017, more than 1300 cops had been investigated for dodgy behaviour but this shrunk to just 474 in 2019/2020.

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The Met Police chief Dame Cressida Dick told the Radio Times back in 2019 she was 'outraged' at the show's portrayal of corruption in the police force but could see it was 'good drama'. She also admitted that the show had brought 'interest and applications'.

Line of Duty series 6 is on at 9pm on Sundays on BBC One.

Featured Image Credit: BBC

Topics: UK News, BBC, TV News, TV & Film, TV Entertainment, Line of Duty

Charlie Bell
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