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Thousands Of Rail Passengers Face Their Season Ticket Being Hiked By More Than £100 Next Year All Thanks To Inflation

Thousands Of Rail Passengers Face Their Season Ticket Being Hiked By More Than £100 Next Year All Thanks To Inflation

If you're commute isn't already expensive - and frustrating - enough, there's a good chance the fare of your season ticket could be pushed up by more than £100 next year if the economists are right.

Rail fares rise in line with the Retail Price Index inflation measure, and although this figure won't be released until next week, it's predicted to rise by 2.7 to 2.9 per cent.

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Credit: Unsplash
Credit: Unsplash

If you're living and working in London, this would add an extra 100 quid to your ticket, but you're not the only ones affected. Travellers from Guildford, Crawley and St Albans to the capital would see prices jump by £103, too, while according to figures from the Campaign for Better Transport, hikes from other cities would be as follows:

Stevenage: £104

Chelmsford: £110

Farnham: £112

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Horsham: £113

Basingstoke: £124

Reading: £124

Bracknell: £124

Maidstone: £124

Tunbridge Wells: £129

Brighton: £131

Cambridge: £138

Oxford: £142

Colchester: £142

Milton Keynes: £145

Canterbury: £151

Southampton Central: £159

Credit: PA
Credit: PA

"Next year's fare rise will come as a blow to passengers already paying thousands of pounds to ensure overcrowding, delays and trains that fail to stop at stations as scheduled," Darren Shirley, chief executive of the Campaign for Better Transport told the Evening Standard.

It was just a couple of weeks ago that the country's rail network went into meltdown as the UK experienced record-breaking July temperatures.

Credit: PA
Credit: PA

As regular travellers, we also know how often we have to deal with late and cancelled trains, strikes, signal failures and train breakdowns, so this proposed price hike would really be a kick in the teeth.

At the time, Andrew Haines, chief executive of Network Rail apologised saying: "Core parts of the network did not cope in the extreme hear, and as an industry we struggled to get passengers the information they really needed to reach their destinations."

Which isn't really good enough when passengers are already paying hundreds for their tickets now is it, Andrew?

*The annual maximum increase in regulated fares is linked to July's Retail Prices Index measure of inflation, which the Office for National Statistics revealed on 14th August stood at 2.8%.

Featured Image Credit: PA

Topics: Life News, Real, travel

Naomi Chadderton

Naomi is a freelance journalist working for Tyla. After graduating from The University of Nottingham, Naomi moved out to Dubai where she worked for Grazia Middle East and Harper's Bazaar Arabia. She is now back home and enjoying the London life.

 

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