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Sweet meaning behind the flowers placed on Queen Elizabeth II's coffin

Shola Lee

Published 
| Last updated 

Sweet meaning behind the flowers placed on Queen Elizabeth II's coffin

Featured Image Credit: Shutterstock/SOPA Images Limited / Alamy Stock Photo

As tributes continue to pour in for Queen Elizabeth II, people are discovering the sweet meaning behind the flowers placed on her coffin.

Following her death on Thursday, 8 September, Britain's longest reigning monarch has been lying in state for the public to pay their respects.

Her coffin was first placed in St. Giles' Cathedral, Edinburgh, before moving down to Westminster Hall, London.

The Queen's wreath was laid on top of her coffin as she made her way to Westminster Hall. Credit: PA / Aaron Chown
The Queen's wreath was laid on top of her coffin as she made her way to Westminster Hall. Credit: PA / Aaron Chown

The late monarch was brought to St Giles Cathedral after making the six-hour journey from Balmoral in the Scottish Highlands.

The Queen's coffin arrived at the cathedral on 12 September and was topped with a wreath that contained sweet peas, dahlias, phlox, white heather, and pine fir.

The official Royal Family Twitter account revealed details about the arrangement: "Her Majesty The Queen’s coffin has left Balmoral.

"Accompanied by The Princess Royal and Sir Tim Laurence, the cortege will travel to the Palace of Holyroodhouse.

"The Wreath on the coffin features dahlias, sweet peas, phlox, white heather, and pine fir from the Balmoral Estate."

People were quick to comment on the sweet peas in the arrangement, which are symbolic of departures and also featured in Prince Phillip's memorial wreath, which the Queen chose herself.

One Twitter user said about the fitting tribute: "I believe the Queen has sweet peas on her coffin (as well as other flowers) and they were also on Prince Phillip’s coffin as well…"

Others suggested that the choice of sweet peas, the birth flower for April, was a reflection of the Queen's birthday: "The Queen chose sweet peas for her casket flowers such an April baby."


A third said that sweet peas were one of the Queen's favourite flowers: "The flowers chosen were dahlias, phlox, white heather and pine fir as well as cuttings of one of Queen Elizabeth II’s favourite blooms. Amidst the petals were fragrant sweet peas, long a treasured flower for The Queen."

However, the wreath has since been changed for the Queen's lying-in-state in Westminster Hall, the wreath on top of her coffin now features pine from the gardens of Balmoral and lavender from Windsor.

The wreath is also said to feature white roses, dahlias, rosemary, and pittosporum.

Dahlias are typically associated with beauty, kindness, and commitment – they tend to bloom long after other flowers have died, which could be symbolic of the Queen's enduring legacy.

Topics: Royal Family, The Queen

Shola Lee
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