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Brits Warned To Check Their Batch Cards Before Travelling To Europe

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Brits Warned To Check Their Batch Cards Before Travelling To Europe

Brits planning on travelling to parts of Europe this year are being urged to check the batch number on their vaccine cards.

The EU's Digital Covid Certificate - aka vaccine passport - launched this week, but some Brits will not qualify if they received the Oxford Astra-Zeneca vaccine if it was manufactured in India.

Brits planning on travelling to parts of Europe this year are being urged to check the batch number on their vaccine cards (Credit: PA)
Brits planning on travelling to parts of Europe this year are being urged to check the batch number on their vaccine cards (Credit: PA)

The certificate allows those who are fully vaccinated, recently tested or recovered after having the virus to travel across borders without the need to quarantine or undergo extra tests.

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Although the vaccines produced at the Serum Institute in India are identical to those made in Europe, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) has still not authorised its use.

According to reports, the Serum Institute is seeking emergency EU authorisation for the vaccine - also known as Covishield - while AZ says it's working on the "inclusion of Covishield as a recognised vaccine for immunisation passports".

Up to five million doses of the vaccine have been administered in the UK (Credit: PA)
Up to five million doses of the vaccine have been administered in the UK (Credit: PA)

Up to 5 million doses of the vaccine have been administered in the UK. The Telegraph reports they are identifiable by the vaccine batch numbers 4120Z001, 4120Z002, 4120Z003 on vaccine cards and in the Covid travel pass section of the NHS app.

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Although vaccines eligible for the pass have been approved by the EMA, a number of countries within the EU have approved India's vaccine for travellers. These countries are: Austria, Germany, Slovenia, Greece, Ireland, Spain, Iceland and Switzerland.

"Entry into the EU should be allowed to people fully vaccinated with one of the vaccines authorised in the EU," a European Commission spokesperson said.

"Member States are... not required to issue certificates for a vaccine that is not authorised on their territory."

If you are planning on jetting off this year, make sure you check travel requirements (Credit: PA)
If you are planning on jetting off this year, make sure you check travel requirements (Credit: PA)
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It is reported that the reason the EMA has not authorised the vaccine is because manufacturers have not yet secured a licence for them to be administered in Europe.

If you are planning on jetting off this year, make sure you check travel requirements - and your vaccine card - before you book!

Featured Image Credit: PA/Shutterstock

Topics: News, Coronavirus, travel

Lucy Devine
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