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You Can Now Get A 3D Printed Ultrasound Of Your Unborn Baby

You Can Now Get A 3D Printed Ultrasound Of Your Unborn Baby

A 3D-printed type of ultrasound means that blind parents are able to 'see' their unborn babies.

By conducting special ultrasounds and using 3D-printed technology, doctors can make incredible 3D printouts of an unborn baby's face.

For parents with impaired vision - like Taylor Ellis, 26, who was born with glaucoma - the 3D prints are a miraculous alternative to traditional scans.

When Taylor had her 20-week scan and was unable to see her baby, she was left in tears.

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Taylor was devastated when she was unable to see her 20-week scan (Credit: SWNS)
Taylor was devastated when she was unable to see her 20-week scan (Credit: SWNS)

When her doctors found out, they created a special 3D ultrasound for Taylor, allowing her to get to know her baby's features through touch.

Mum-of-three Taylor and her husband Jeremy, 28, who is also visually impaired, said that being able to feel the scan was a dream come true.

Baby Rosalie is now ten weeks old, and Taylor said the 3D printing technology - most commonly used to make car parts - was "life changing".

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Taylor, a stay-at-home-mother from Cockeysville, Maryland, said: "I always thought about what my baby would look like and was always saddened to know I wouldn't have the same opportunity as seeing mothers.

The scans use printing technology which is most commonly used to make car parts (Credit: SWNS)
The scans use printing technology which is most commonly used to make car parts (Credit: SWNS)

"My sight wasn't as bad with my first two children, so I could see the 2D ultrasound.

"During my 20 week ultrasound for Rosalie I cried; I thought I would never get that big moment that seeing mothers are waiting for.

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Talking about the 3D ultra-sound, Taylor said: "It was a really cool experience as I have never seen something like this before. I was really disappointed with my other ones as I found them difficult to see, this was so special.

"The model is made out of a bright red material that has a plastic-feel. It felt weird at first but when I had the realisation that this was my baby's face, it was so heart-warming".

Taylor has been registered blind since birth due to glaucoma, but her sight has steadily declined since and she now uses a walking aid.

Baby Rosalie's birth went to plan and she is doing well (Credit: SWNS)
Baby Rosalie's birth went to plan and she is doing well (Credit: SWNS)
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The doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore traditionally use the technology to create models of unborn babies with the spinal defect spina bifida, as it allows surgeons to get a clear image of the baby's spine.

An ultrasound sonographer at the same hospital then suggested the technology be used to help blind parents.

The model takes three-and-half hours to print and the hospital in Cockeysville, Maryland, is thought to be the first in the world to offer the service.

Taylor said: "When I found out I could have the 3D scan I was ecstatic.

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"I showed off my scan to my daughters and my parents on video chat.

"That moment was something I spent a long time wishing and waiting for".

We wish the family all the best (Credit: SWNS)
We wish the family all the best (Credit: SWNS)

Rosalie was born naturally on June 10, weighing 8lbs 2oz. We wish the family all the best.

Featured Image Credit: SWNS

Topics: Mum, News, Parents

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Mary-Jane Wiltsher

Mary-Jane Wiltsher is a freelance lifestyle and culture journalist. Elsewhere she writes for Stylist, Euronews, PHOENIX and What We Seee.