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NHS official advice for Brits suffering from 'highly-contagious' '100-day cough'

Rhiannon Ingle

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| Last updated 

NHS official advice for Brits suffering from 'highly-contagious' '100-day cough'

Featured Image Credit: nensuria/Getty/gpointstudio/Getty Images

Just about everyone in the UK right now either has a sore throat, a runny rose, a splitting headache or a mix of all three right now.

Well, what we're all feeling pretty groggy over isn't just your average cold - oh no.

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The sickness is being referred to by medics as the '100-day cough' given its ability to send sufferers into severe coughing fits lasting as long as three months.

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The NHS has since issued its official advice for the 'highly-contagious' Whooping Cough as we plunge further into these arctic temperatures.

Reports of the '100-day-cough' have tripled in cases this year, compared to 2022 and over the last five months, around 716 cases have been documented.

The NHS has released its official advice on the 'highly contagious' '100-day-cough' taking over the UK right now. Credit: SimpleImages / Getty Images
The NHS has released its official advice on the 'highly contagious' '100-day-cough' taking over the UK right now. Credit: SimpleImages / Getty Images

Professor Helen Bedford - an expert in child public health at University College London - has warned parents that cases of Whooping Cough are increasing 'as expected'.

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"So it's vital pregnant women ensure they get vaccinated to protect their baby." she said.

"Whooping Cough in young babies can be very serious and vaccinating their mothers in pregnancy is the only way of ensuring they are protected in the first few months."

According to the NHS, after suffering with the initial symptoms of the '100-day-cough' for around a week, your child will likely experience further coughing fits, which can last as long as a few minutes.

The NHS has advised people to see their GP if they or their child have the symptoms of Whooping Cough. Credit: nensuria / Getty Images
The NHS has advised people to see their GP if they or their child have the symptoms of Whooping Cough. Credit: nensuria / Getty Images
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The NHS has also advised people to see their GP if they or their child have the symptoms of Whooping Cough.

These include:

  • Getting coughing bouts that last for a few minutes and are worse at night
  • Making a 'whoop' sound or a gasp for breath between coughs
  • Having difficulty breathing after a coughing bout with infants turning blue or grey
  • Coughs that can bring up a thick mucus which can make you vomit and becoming very red in the face.

The cough may also last for several weeks or months.

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"Whooping cough can spread very easily. It's best to call the GP before you go in. They might suggest talking over the phone," the NHS official website explains.

"If you or your child are having significant breathing difficulties, fits, chest pain or signs of pneumonia call 999 or go to your nearest A&E."

While people do recover from the '100-day-cough', the NHS also advises getting plenty of rest, drinking lots of fluids, and taking paracetamol or ibuprofen to treat a fever.

For more information, you can visit the NHS website here.

Topics: UK News, Weather, Health, NHS

Rhiannon Ingle
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