Advert

Latest

2 days ago
Advert
3 days ago
Advert

Most Popular

3 days ago
Advert

Ingredient Found In Viagra Could Cut Labour Time In Half, Study Suggests

Ingredient Found In Viagra Could Cut Labour Time In Half, Study Suggests

Viagra could halve the time women spend in labour and prevent emergency C-sections, according to experts.

The drug that typically helps treat erectile dysfunction was used on full term pregnant women in a study at the Mater Research Institute in Queensland and it produced miraculous results. From reduced labour times to less requirement for traumatic caesareans.

Advert

Sounds groundbreaking ladies.

Sildenafil Citrate (widely know by the brand name Viagra) was found to significantly increase pelvic blood flow, which in turn helped oxygen reach a baby's brain. During contractions, blood flow from mother to baby can drop by up to 60 per cent.

The pilot study showed Viagra decreased the amount of emergency C-Sections. (Credit: Shutterstock)
The pilot study showed Viagra decreased the amount of emergency C-Sections. (Credit: Shutterstock)

Increased oxygen means there is less chance for babies to become distressed or have health complications such as cerebral palsy as a result.

The pilot trial saw researchers administer Viagra or a placebo to 300 Australian full-term pregnant women and it cut the time spent in the later stages of labour by half, saw 50 per cent less emergency births and 50 per cent less need for forcep-use in delivery.

Advert

Professor Sailesh Kumar told ABC: "Increasing blood flow improves the transport of oxygen and nutrients to the baby and this may reduce the risk of the baby becoming distressed in labour."

"Emergency caesarean births are associated with poorer results for both the mother and baby,'" he said.

The hope is to carry out a much bigger study in future on 8,500 women. (Credit: PA)
The hope is to carry out a much bigger study in future on 8,500 women. (Credit: PA)

Sean Seeho, from the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, also added that one in four emergency caesareans are usually required because of a baby's distress, according to ABC.

"So if this does prove to be beneficial and reduce foetal distress in labour, then certainly this would be a very effective way to reduce caesarean sections," Dr Seeho said.

Thanks to the success of this small study, now Professor Kumar has a larger study of 8,500 women on the cards and thinks result could be a "game changer".

"If we were able to reduce the burden of this medical problem, we could potentially make a difference to overall perinatal outcomes, not just within Australia, but worldwide as well," he said.

But, the study isn't risk free. A different study was carried out in the Netherlands using Viagra on women whose babies were severely underdeveloped and considered at risk - but the dose administered was much higher and delivered much earlier in the pregnancy.

It was however quickly abandoned because 11 babies developed lung problems and consequently died.

And although Professor Kumar's study showed no side effects and there were big difference in the two, he has temporarily halted the trial to gather more information about the Dutch study.

"I don't think that both studies are directly comparable," Professor Kumar said.

But if it ends up working without risk, we're here for it. HALF the time ladies, HALF the time.

Featured Image Credit: Pixabay

Topics: Pregnancy, Health

Lauren Bell

A freelance journalist working for Tyla. After graduating with a journalism degree, Lauren started off in real life magazines before moving into the fashion and lifestyle sector at the likes of Mail Online and Sun Online. Contact Tyla: [email protected]

 

Next Up

New Documentary Shows April Jones' Murderer Mark Bridger Feign Upset In Police Interview

New Documentary Shows April Jones' Murderer Mark Bridger Feign Upset In Police Interview

24 days ago