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Statutory Sick Pay Is Changing Today - Here's What You Need To Know

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Statutory Sick Pay Is Changing Today - Here's What You Need To Know

Statutory Sick Pay is changing today for all employees - including full-time, part-time, agency, casual and fixed-term members of staff. 

It comes as the UK Health Security Agency has expanded the list of Covid symptoms and a new law that allows staff members to go to work even if they test positive for Coronavirus.

Whilst many workplaces will have their own rates of sick pay, there are laws to compensate you if you’re unwell and unable to go to work for more than four days.

Statutory Sick Pay is changing today for all employees - including full-time, part-time, agency, casual and fixed-term members of staff (Pexels Andrea Piacquadio).
Statutory Sick Pay is changing today for all employees - including full-time, part-time, agency, casual and fixed-term members of staff (Pexels Andrea Piacquadio).
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Statutory Sick Pay is a legal requirement that protects all employees when they’re off sick, except those who are self-employed, and is paid by your employer. 

In the UK, employees were entitled to be paid statutory sick pay if they are sick for four days or more in a row (including days off) and earn on average at least £120 a week before tax is deducted.

Previously, workers would be compensated £96.35 a week for up to 28 weeks and paid by their employer as normal, with tax and national insurance deducted from this figure.

What do I need to know about the new Statutory Sick Pay?

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Now, from 6th April, those who qualify for Statutory Sick Pay and the amount paid is changing.

The rate of pay per week will be increasing to £99.35 from today - an increase of £3 per week.

The new rate of Statutory Sick Pay is still paid when the employee is sick for at least four days in a row, including ‘non-working’ days, and is paid in the same way as their normal wages, deducting tax and national insurance.

However, employers can’t count a day as a ‘sick day’ if an employee has worked for one minute or more before they go home sick. 

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Therefore, if you become sick whilst working on shift or after it has finished, it won’t be classed as a sick day until the day after. 

Employees are entitled to this new rate so long as they have an employment contract, have done some work under their contract and have been sick for four or more days in a row (including non-working days). 

Staff workers also have to earn an average of at least £123 a week and give their employers notice and proof of illness when required.

Featured Image Credit: Pexels/Unsplash

Topics: Health, Life, Money, Coronavirus, Politics

Gabriella Ferlita
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