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This 'Controversial' Tampax Tampon Ad Has Been Banned And Wtf

This 'Controversial' Tampax Tampon Ad Has Been Banned And Wtf

The decision to ban a 'controversial' tampon advert may be overturned - but we can't quite believe it was banned in the first place.

You can watch it here:

The informative health video, titled 'Tampons & Tea', received 150 complaints to the Advertising Standards Authority for Ireland (ASAI), with 83 per cent of these coming from women.

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The lighthearted ad, all about how to insert a tampon correctly, was banned in Ireland by the ASAI for allegedly causing widespread offence - it turns out some people find discussion of a perfectly normal bodily function 'vulgar'. Thankfully, the ASAI has now said it will be reviewing its findings.

The ad begins with a chat show host asking an interviewee - and the audience - if they could feel their tampon when it was inserted.

The interviewee then sheepishly puts up her hand.

The 'controversial' advert explains how to insert a tampon correctly (Credit: Tampax)
The 'controversial' advert explains how to insert a tampon correctly (Credit: Tampax)
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"You shouldn't," the chat show host says. "It might mean your tampon isn't in far enough."

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"You've gotta get 'em up there girls," she then enthuses, to a round of applause from the audience.

The advert promotes Tampax's Pearl Compak, with their grip design aimed at helping to insert a tampon correctly.

"Pull it, lock it and put it in," the ad continues. "Not just the tip, up to the grip."

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"Get 'em up there girls," the host finishes, while the audience goes wild.

Some viewers took offence to phrases such as these (Credit: Tampax)
Some viewers took offence to phrases such as these (Credit: Tampax)

The advertising authority originally banned the advert due to the number of complaints received, which it said was "indicative of consumer sentiment".

The ASAI said some viewers took offence to the "vulgar, embarrassing and crude" language, while others said the language used in the ad was "overdescriptive, inappropriately expressed and with excessive detail".

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And further complaints argued that the ad was demeaning to women who would already know how to insert a tampon correctly.

A spokesperson from ASAI said it would now "provide further clarity on the decision" based on complaints received about the decision to ban the ad.

Featured Image Credit: Tampax

Topics: Real Life, Health

Aneira Davies

Aneira Davies is a freelance lifestyle journalist with a particular interest in interiors and craft. She has written for the Evening Standard, Prima, House Beautiful and Good Housekeeping.