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Hotel makes over £22,000 a day from Singapore Sling cocktails

Emma Rosemurgey

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| Last updated 

If you've ever gone out drinking in Singapore, there's a good there's a good chance you'll be familiar with - and perhaps have even tried - the famous cocktail, the Singapore Sling.

The iconic beverage is widely known as the country's national drink after its invention by bartender Ngiam Tong Boon at the Raffles Hotel in 1915 - and has even been credited for changing Singapore's views on allowing women to drink.

But despite its huge popularity, the cocktail doesn't come cheap, with just one Singapore Sling expected to set you back around 39 Singapore dollars, which currently converts to an eye-watering £22 per glass.

The iconic cocktail will set you back. Credit: Pixabay
The iconic cocktail will set you back. Credit: Pixabay
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You'd be forgiven for thinking that such a high price point would be off-putting to visitors of the iconic hotel, but the truth is quite the opposite.

The historic Long Bar, located in the luxury hotel, is said to sell around 1000 of the cocktails per day during peak season, which means around £22,000 in takings every single day on Singapore Slings alone.

There's no disputing the fact the signature cocktail has become somewhat of a bucket list experience for people from all over the world travelling to Singapore, but what does it actually taste like?

Well, recipes do vary slightly but traditionally, it consists of gin, cherry brand, lime and pineapple juice, Cointreau and herbal liquor Benedictine, mixed together to create a sweet and slightly sour, pink cocktail. Yum.

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The cocktail is popular among tourists. Credit: TikTok/@swizzyinsg
The cocktail is popular among tourists. Credit: TikTok/@swizzyinsg

Tourists regularly flock to Raffles Hotel Singapore, which opened its doors in 1887, to get their hands on a Singapore Sling, and immerse themselves in the unusual traditions of the iconic hotel.

In fact, if you ever do visit Raffles, you'll have to be careful not to step on any peanut shells when you walk into the Long Bar, thanks to the tradition of punters simply chucking the shells on the floor.

Singapore is famed for being an incredibly clean, tidy and litter-free country, but the act of tossing the peanut shells dates back to when Raffles was surrounded by nut plantations in the 1900s.

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There was such a plentiful supply of nuts that drinkers were given bags of peanuts for free - something which still happens to this day.

Back then, however, plantation owners would just sweep the nutshells onto the floor and the act has since become a liberating tradition for anyone visiting the Long Bar.

Topics: Food and Drink, Travel

Emma Rosemurgey
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