Tyla

To make sure you never miss out on your favourite NEW stories, we're happy to send you some reminders

Click 'OK' then 'Allow' to enable notifications

Not now
OK

Classic British Seafood Dish At Risk Of 'Extinction' As Two Thirds Of Gen Z-ers Can't Name It

Ali Condon

Published 
| Last updated 

Classic British Seafood Dish At Risk Of 'Extinction' As Two Thirds Of Gen Z-ers Can't Name It

Featured Image Credit: Alamy

As Gen Z take over from Millennials and begin to dictate what's hot and what's not, industries are slowly being affected as a result.

One example of this is the British food industry, where certain classic delicacies are reportedly dying out.

According to new research, younger people are leaning towards healthier food options and world cuisine rather than traditional British foods like black puddings, pork pies, gammon, and jellied eels.

Jellied eels are dying out thanks to younger generations. (Credit: Alamy)
Jellied eels are dying out thanks to younger generations. (Credit: Alamy)

Research by Sushi Daily uncovered that Gen Z were the least familiar with jellied eels, with just under two thirds of the age group having never even tried it.

The dish originates from 18th Century East London, and consists of chopped eels that have been boiled in a stock and form a jelly consistency once cooled.

Jellied eels are regarded as an acquired taste, but can be rich in omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin B12.

Jellied eels can be rich in omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin B12. (Credit: Alamy)
Jellied eels can be rich in omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin B12. (Credit: Alamy)

Speaking to i news on the new research, Frank Bradley of West London fish supplier Bradley’s suggested that the food could be more popular if it had a rebrand.

"People didn’t want to eat Patagonian toothfish,” he said, “but renaming it Chilean sea bass made people want it."

Other classic British meals that are likely to die out in the near future include Saveloy sausage and chips, Lancashire hotpot, liver and onions, pie and mash with liquor, bubble and squeak, and Welsh rarebit.

The new research also found that almost half of those aged 18 to 29 regarded traditional British foods as old fashioned.

Instead, the nations favourite meals consisted of tacos, burritos, beef chow mein, and spicy chicken madras.

The dish originates from 18th Century East London. (Credit: Alamy)
The dish originates from 18th Century East London. (Credit: Alamy)

Ian Roberts from Sushi Daily, which conducted the survey of 1,500 Brits, said: "Old, unhealthy, stodgy dishes are being replaced with more modern, healthier options including sushi and sashimi. 

"This trend is reflected in the increasing popularity of our dishes at more than 100 Waitrose and Asda stores across the UK."

Topics: Food and Drink

Ali Condon
More like this

Chosen for YouChosen for You

Life

This is how much it costs to keep your Christmas tree lights on

an hour ago

Most Read StoriesMost Read

Cameron Diaz and Kate Winslet 'filming sequel to The Holiday'

9 hours ago