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This Facebook Page Dedicated To People Who Hate Coriander Has 220,000 Members And We're Here For It

This Facebook Page Dedicated To People Who Hate Coriander Has 220,000 Members And We're Here For It

It's perhaps one of the most divisive topics this country has seen since to Leave or Remain, yet the big debate around coriander is one we may never come to a deal with.

Some think the herb add a delicious nuance to our curries and soups, some thinks it's the devil spawn and tastes like actual soap.

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Now, supporters of the latter have created a Facebook group chronically their hate for the leafy seasoning - and it's 220,000 strong following proves some people really, really despise coriander.

Credit: Facebook/I Hate Coriander
Credit: Facebook/I Hate Coriander

I Hate Coriander does exactly what it says on the tin.

The Facebook page is filled with people slandering the herb, from hate-filled memes to selfies giving fields of coriander the middle finger, and even a 'f*ck coriander' tattoo. Now that's dedication.

The founder of the group, Jack Bailey from Sydney, Australia, has since gone on to start selling merch enabling followers to express their coriander loathing more outwardly.

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Credit: Facebook/I Hate Coriander
Credit: Facebook/I Hate Coriander

Items from the collection include tees (costing $29.95, £16.50), hoodies ($44.95, £24.78), vinyl stickers ($10, £5.51) and bottle openers ($6.95, £3.85).

If you're interested in why coriander causes such controversy at the dinner table, genetics is a likely culprit.

23andMe, the largest genetic testing company, surveyed 50,000 people asking their thoughts on coriander.

A few years ago the largest genetic testing company 23andMe surveyed 50,000 of their customers asking whether they liked the taste of coriander or found it to be soapy.


Credit: I Hate Coriander
Credit: I Hate Coriander

When comparing the DNA of coriander haters to coriander lovers, the researchers found a gene thought to be associated with those than found it soapy-tasting.

"Cilantro's aromatic qualities primarily depend on a group of compounds known as aldehydes," the report stated.

"One type of aldehyde has been described as being 'fruity' and 'green' and another type as being 'soapy' and 'pungent'.

"One of the eight genes near the SNP we identified codes for a receptor called OR6A2, which is known to detect aldehydes such as those found in cilantro."

There's even some evidence to suggest corianderphobes can get over their aversion to it if they repeatedly eat the stuff, though we doubt they'll be lining up to take this on.

Featured Image Credit: Unsplash

Topics: Tasty Food

Ciara Sheppard

Ciara is a freelance journalist working for Tyla. After graduating from the University of Sussex, Ciara worked as a writer at GLAMOUR Magazine and later as the Assistant Editor of Yahoo Style UK.

 

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