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Australia Is Banning Entry To Anyone Found Guilty Of Domestic Abuse

Emma Rosemurgey

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| Last updated 

Australia Is Banning Entry To Anyone Found Guilty Of Domestic Abuse

Featured Image Credit: Pixabay

Australia has just banned anyone who's ever been found guilty of domestic violence from entering the country.

The country had already blocked the likes of Chris Brown and Floyd Mayweather from gaining visas to enter the country, thanks to their domestic violence convictions and now that will apply to all foreign visitors or residents who have been found guilty of violence against women or children.

Chris Brown has been blocked from getting an Australian visa. Credit: PA Images
Chris Brown has been blocked from getting an Australian visa. Credit: PA Images

Under the new broadened migration law, which came into practice on 28th February, domestic abusers who already have visas and are living in Australia can be kicked out.

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"Australia has no tolerance for perpetrators of violence against women and children," Federal Minister for Immigration, Citizenship and Multicultural Affairs David Coleman said in a public statement.

Credit: Pexels
Credit: Pexels

"The message is clear: if you've been convicted of a violent crime against women or children, you are not welcome in this country, wherever the offence occurred, whatever the sentence.

"By cancelling the visas of criminals we have made Australia a safer place. These crimes inflict long lasting trauma on the victims and their friends and family, and foreign criminals who commit them are not welcome in our country."

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Credit: Pexels
Credit: Pexels

However, not everyone's happy about the new law - particularly neighbouring New Zealand, as it could mean New Zealanders who have already served their time for domestic violence and lived in Australia most of their lives could be kicked out and sent back to live in New Zealand.

Obviously, the move sends a powerful message, however it's worth noting that it's only meaningful if the country also works towards tackling the issue of domestic abuse within its own citizens.

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A study by the Australian Bureau of Statistics found that 17 per cent of Australian women and six per cent of Australian men have experienced domestic violence since the age of 15. These numbers have remained pretty stagnant since 2005.

Topics: News, Travel News, travel, Australia

Emma Rosemurgey
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