Tyla

To make sure you never miss out on your favourite NEW stories, we're happy to send you some reminders

Click 'OK' then 'Allow' to enable notifications

Not now
OK

Half Of Men Say They Wouldn’t Want To Take A Male Birth Control Pill

Harvey Day

Published 
| Last updated 

Half Of Men Say They Wouldn’t Want To Take A Male Birth Control Pill

Featured Image Credit: Pexels

Half of British men 'definitely' or 'probably' would not be willing to take a male version of the contraceptive pill, a new national poll has found.

Polling firm YouGov revealed that a quarter (27 per cent) of surveyed men say they would 'definitely not' be willing to take it, with another quarter (23 per cent) saying they would 'probably' not.

Pollsters also looked at the reasons why men would be against taking a form of hormonal contraception and found that the most common concern is potential side effects, such as weight gain, acne and mood changes.

 Weight gain was one side effect men were worried about. Credit: Pexels
Weight gain was one side effect men were worried about. Credit: Pexels

Currently, there are only two effective contraceptive methods available to men: condoms or a vasectomy (a minor, reversible, surgical procedure that stops sperm from reaching the semen ejaculated from the penis).

According to the NHS, however, researchers are optimistic that a safe, effective and reversible method of male contraception will eventually become a reality, although this is still several years away.

Over a quarter wouldn't consider using a male version of the pill. Credit: Pexels
Over a quarter wouldn't consider using a male version of the pill. Credit: Pexels

In fact, a 2018 study from the University of Washington, Seattle found that a new birth control pill for men appears to be safe when used daily for a month, with hormone responses consistent with effective contraception.

Like the pill for women, the experimental male oral contraceptive-called dimethandrolone undecanoate (DMAU), combines activity of an androgen (male hormone) like testosterone, and a progestin, and is taken once a day, said the study's senior investigator, Dr Stephanie Page.

Loading…

"DMAU is a major step forward in the development of a once-daily 'male pill'," Page said. "Many men say they would prefer a daily pill as a reversible contraceptive, rather than long-acting injections or topical gels, which are also in development."

Topics: Life News, Sex & Relationships, Health

Harvey Day
More like this

Chosen for YouChosen for You

News

Queen’s cause of death was old age, death certificate confirms

4 days ago

Most Read StoriesMost Read

Mum divides opinion after letting five-year-old daughter bleach her hair

2 days ago