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Sending Unsolicited 'D*ck Pics' Could Soon Become Illegal

Sending Unsolicited 'D*ck Pics' Could Soon Become Illegal

Any women who's ever used the likes of Snapchat, Tinder, Instagram and basically every other form of social media will probably be familiar with the plight of receiving an unsolicited d*ck pic.

While it remains unknown why some men believe we want to see their bare penis, despite not asking for it, the government could be about to make it illegal practice.

Unwanted willy pics are arguably just another form of sexual harassment bestowed on women, but luckily the government is currently looking at the best way to tackle it as an issue.

Credit: PA Images
Credit: PA Images
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The Home Office has just revealed it is refreshing the Violence Against Women and Girls (VAWG) strategy, particularly in the wake of the Me To movement which highlighted there's still a lot to be done in the battle against harassment against women.

In doing so, the Home Office has proposed 10 commitments, as well as more than £100 million, towards adequately protecting women and girls in the UK.

One of the commitments is a review on 'online flashing,' which is pretty polite way of describing unsolicited nudes like d*ck pics.

Credit: Apple
Credit: Apple
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The new strategy aims to "explore issues of online flashing and consider options for next steps." It describes the act as "a form of sexual harassment whereby individuals send out explicit sexual images without the consent of those receiving it, including through sharing files on public transport with strangers," adding the government is keen "to consider this issue in more depth and develop an appropriate response."

Although it's unclear what the response will be at this stage, recognising unsolicited pics as sexual harassment is a definite step in the right direction.

According to a poll by BBC Radio 5 Live in November last year, two in three British adults say it should be illegal to send unsolicited images of your genitals.

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This sentiment is shared by Conservative MP Maria Miller, who is campaigning to see new legislation introduced to reflect this. Maria is keen to focus on the harm that receiving such images can have on children and young people.

"I hope people wake up [to the fact] that this is a sex offence if you're dealing with under-18s," she stressed, adding that it is illegal to send explicit images to anyone under the age of 18.

Featured Image Credit: Waitrose

Topics: Life News, News, Real

Emma Rosemurgey

Emma Rosemurgey is an NCTJ trained Junior Journalist at Tyla. She graduated from the University of Central Lancashire in Preston and started her career in regional newspapers before joining the team in 2017. Contact her on [email protected]

 

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