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UK Public Told It Is Their Duty To Report Neighbours Flouting Covid-19 Rules, Police Chief Says

UK Public Told It Is Their Duty To Report Neighbours Flouting Covid-19 Rules, Police Chief Says

A police chief has told the public it's their duty to snitch on neighbours who break coronavirus restrictions.

According to The Times, Merseyside Chief Constable Andy Cooke has insisted that reporting those who flout the rules could save lives, adding that the public has a "civic duty" and condemning the "sneering culture."

Mr Cooke said it was a 'civic duty' (Credit: Pexels)
Mr Cooke said it was a 'civic duty' (Credit: Pexels)

"People are doing a civic duty in contacting us for the right reasons," he said.

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"The vast majority of people across the country are really concerned about this. Any information that you can give us in relation to breaches will save lives, and that's why people are doing it."

Meanwhile, Martin Hewitt, chairman of the National Police Chiefs Council (NPCC), added: "With those kind of egregious breaches, which are putting everybody at risk, it is perfectly legitimate for a member of public to share that share that information."

So far, 20,223 fines have been handed out in England and Wales between 27th March and 19th October, according to the NPCC. Two third of this were given to people under the age of 35.

Mr Hewitt didn't comment on police intervention at Christmas (Credit: PA)
Mr Hewitt didn't comment on police intervention at Christmas (Credit: PA)
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Mr Hewitt didn't give any further information about how police would approach the festive period and potential breaches of restrictions.

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"Wherever you are in the country at any point - but certainly at Christmas as well - then I would advocate that everybody needs to understand precisely what the regulations are that relate to their parts of the country," he said.

"From two months out it's probably too early to start, I would say, making huge plans because because you just don't know what those regulations are going to be at that point in time."

His comments come after West Midlands Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC) David Jamieson said yesterday that police could enter homes to break up family Christmas dinners, if Brits do not adhere to restrictions.

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David Jamieson said police could enter homes to break up family Christmas dinners (Credit: Unsplash)
David Jamieson said police could enter homes to break up family Christmas dinners (Credit: Unsplash)

"If we think there's large groups of people gathering where they shouldn't be, then police will have to intervene," he told The Telegraph.

"If, again, there's flagrant breaking of the rules, then the police would have to enforce. It's not the police's job to stop people enjoying their Christmas. However, we are there to enforce the rules that the Government makes, and if the Government makes those rules then the Government has to explain that to the public

"The police are there to enforce it and keep people safe - they're not there to make judgments about whether people should enjoy themselves or not."

Featured Image Credit: Unsplash

Topics: Police, News, Coronavirus

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Lucy Devine

Lucy is a journalist working for Tyla. After graduating with a master's degree in journalism, she has worked in both print and online and is particularly interested in fashion, food, health and women's issues. Northerner, coffee addict, says hun a lot. Get in touch at [email protected]