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People Are Signing A Petition To Stop Boris Johnson Suspending Parliament

People Are Signing A Petition To Stop Boris Johnson Suspending Parliament

The government has successfully gained the Queen's permission to suspend Parliament after MPs return to work next month - just weeks before the Brexit deadline.

Wondering what all this means for Brexit? Don't worry, we're here to explain exactly where Johnson's shock move leaves us, and how to get involved if (like the 390k people who have already signed the petition) you're not happy about it.

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Credit: PA
Credit: PA

What the f*ck just happened?

Boris Johnson has announced plans to prorogue (ie suspend) Parliament from mid-September for nearly five weeks and hold what's known as the Queen's Speech, which sets out the government's plans for the new parliamentary term.

The current Parliamentary session has been the longest in nearly 400 years. Because of this, Boris has enforced the suspension - claiming he wants more time to set out new bills to "level up" spending on his priorities, including the NHS, education and policing.

However, many believe Boris' decision has more to do with his Brexit plans - with SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon calling it a 'dark day for democracy'.

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The monarch's speech is now planned for Monday, 14th October, two weeks before the UK is due to leave the EU on Thursday, 31st October.

Boris Johnson with the Queen at Buckingham Palace last month (Credit: PA)
Boris Johnson with the Queen at Buckingham Palace last month (Credit: PA)

What does suspending Parliament mean for Brexit?

By choosing to suspend parliament between Wednesday, 11th September and Monday, 14th October, opposition MPs will have less time to pass any laws that would stop Boris taking the UK out of the EU without a deal - something he has repeatedly vowed to do unless the EU changes it's stance on the backstop in Ireland.

Johnson has claimed that there will be ample time for MPs to debate Brexit in the lead-up to a pivotal European Council meeting on 17th and 18th October - 13 days before October's deadline.

Yet, his decision to shut down parliament for five weeks leaves little time for debate and in turn leaves little time for parliament to obstruct his Brexit plans

Credit: PA
Credit: PA

How does this affect a plan to stop a no-deal?

If the original timeline were to take place, there would be a maximum of eight sitting days before they break up for party conference season, which runs usually until 2nd October.

And assuming they returned the Monday after Tory conference, there would be 19 sitting days between then and the deadline. That's just 27 days in which an anti-no-deal coalition could work on ways to block it.

But now the original timeline is up in the air as well as the number of days to stop it with some suggesting a mere 14 days to debate a possible deal.

Credit: PA
Credit: PA

What happens now?

Just yesterday, Jeremy Corbyn along with a cross-party alliance of opposition MPs had agreed to table a law next week aimed at blocking a no-deal Brexit.

Yet, the government's new announcement leaves the opposition with little time. Potentially now, a motion of no confidence will be tabled. In that instance, either a new government will have to be formed or a general election called.

Credit: PA
Credit: PA

I'm not happy about this news, how can I get involved?

More than 350,000 people have already signed a petition against Boris Johnson's decision to suspend parliament and you can sign it here.

The 'Do not prorogue Parliament' petition will now have to be debated in the House of Commons, with thousands more names being added by the minute.

Created by Mark Johnston, those signing the petition argue: "Parliament must not be prorogued or dissolved unless and until the Article 50 period has been sufficiently extended or the UK's intention to withdraw from the EU has been cancelled."

Credit: Petition.UK
Credit: Petition.UK

Hopefully that has given you some insight.

Featured Image Credit: PA

Topics: Life News, News, Real

Lisa McLoughlin

Lisa is a freelance journalist working for Tyla. She has worked for MailOnline, The Sun Online and Ireland's national broadcaster RTÉ. Please contact her on [email protected]

 

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