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Margarita Burn Is The Skin Condition You Should Be Aware Of This Summer

Margarita Burn Is The Skin Condition You Should Be Aware Of This Summer

Sipping on a margarita in the sunshine is one of our favourite summer pastimes.

Yet, we might think about it again as skin condition Margarita Burn, which develops when the skin reacts to plant chemicals, usually found in citrus fruits, has become more apparent than ever.

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The painful ailment, which is aptly named after the lime and salt-based cocktail, occurs when the furocoumarins, a compound found in most citrus fruit, within one of these plants induces a photochemical reaction in the skin when exposed to UVA light.

The exposure then causes damage to the skin cells and while the reaction varies, it can result in irregular-shaped blisters, redness, burning and pain.

Credit: Wikipedia
Credit: Wikipedia
Limes are one of the biggest culprits. Credit: PA Images
Limes are one of the biggest culprits. Credit: PA Images

According to reports in the US, dermatologists have seen an increase in Margarita Burn, which is medically referred to as phytophotodermatitis, during the summer as people spend more time outside.

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And while the skin condition can happen to anyone, bartenders working with citrus juice are a target along with those who encounter furocoumarins while gardening, hiking, fishing, farming and camping.

Although limes are the biggest culprit, lemons, celery, wild parsnip, parsley and hogweed also contain furocoumarins that could trigger phytophotodermatitis.

Speaking to Prevention.com, Dr Joshua Zeichner said that the skin condition can often be misdiagnosed as severe sunburn as well as chemical burns, atopic dermatitis or cellulitis.

Yet, the medical expert explained that reaction is localised and has a distinct appearance.

Those suffering should stay out of the sunlight. Credit: Unsplash
Those suffering should stay out of the sunlight. Credit: Unsplash

He said: "It only develops in areas where the chemical touches the skin, explaining odd shapes like streaks or dots where lime juice may have dripped down the skin or splashed.

"The initial rash is fiery red and it often heels with a dark brown black."

Should you find yourself suffering from the ailment, do not worry as the medic said that aspirin and ibuprofen can help alleviate pain for mild burns.

While doctors may recommend topical steroid cream for "moderate blisters" in a bid to reduce itching and inflammation.

However, your doctor may prescribe oral corticosteroids or antihistamines in more severe cases.

The medical expert said to avoid the sun if suffering from the skin condition and said not to worry should you develop crusted patches of skin once the blisters minimised.

That will have us thinking about enjoying a margarita in the back garden.

Featured Image Credit: Wikipedia

Topics: Life News, Real, Health

Lisa McLoughlin

Lisa is a freelance journalist working for Tyla. She has worked for MailOnline, The Sun Online and Ireland's national broadcaster RTÉ. Please contact her on [email protected]

 

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