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Couple In England Found Lost 4ft Python Behind Their Tumble Dryer

Gregory Robinson

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| Last updated 

Couple In England Found Lost 4ft Python Behind Their Tumble Dryer

Featured Image Credit: RSPCA

A family in Southport, Merseyside, got the fright of their lives when they peeked behind their tumble dryer to find a 4ft Royal Python behind it. Yikes!

The Royal Python is also known as a Ball Python because they tend to roll into a ball when stressed or threatened. This particular Royal Python was found curled up behind a couple's tumble dryer in their utility room.

The couple, who preferred not to be named publicly, described how they had tried to fix their faulty tumble dryer on Sunday, 20th December.

The snake is believed to be an escaped or abandoned pet (Credit: RSPCA)
The snake is believed to be an escaped or abandoned pet (Credit: RSPCA)

The unannounced house guest is believed to be an escaped or abandoned pet. "I was shocked, it's not what you expect when you want to do a bit a laundry," the woman told the charity RSPCA after they collected the snake from the couple's home.

"My husband pulled the drier out and seemed taken aback, and then said 'there's a snake here'," the woman said.

"I thought it would be a small grass snake not a 4ft-long royal python."

They then called the RSPCA and animal rescue officer David Hatton was called to collect the snake from the property.

He said: "I was quite surprised at the size of the snake, which is a non-venomous species, and the fact that it is in such good condition makes me suspect that it is a pet that has escaped.

"I am not sure how it managed to get into the utility room but it was probably attracted by the warmth from the drier when it was on.

"The snake was cold but I soon managed to warm it up. The snake is currently our care and I am hoping whoever owns it will contact us so we can reunite the pair for Christmas."

This particular Royal Python was found curled up behind a couple's tumble dryer in their utility room (Credit: RSPCA)
This particular Royal Python was found curled up behind a couple's tumble dryer in their utility room (Credit: RSPCA)

Mike Potts, senior manager of exotic animal charity BeastWatch UK, said it was a mystery how the animal ended up there. BeastWatch UK are currently caring for the python until it can be brought back home.

Mike told the Liverpool Echo: "I got contacted by an RSPCA collection officer who got in touch with us to ask if we were aware of any missing snakes.

"They had been called out to a family who had found a snake in their dryer in their house.

"I think they were all a bit shocked by it. They weren't reptile keepers themselves."

The snake is described as being in good health after finding refuge behind the tumble dryer.

Mike added: "We weren't aware of any [missing snakes]. It was an unusual situation on a number of levels.

"I'd be less surprised if it happened in the middle of summer because we deal with a lot of snakes that wander off from having a little bit of access to garden space during the summer months.

"But at this time of year people don't let their reptiles outside for good reason.

"It's very cold for a snake from a hot climate. It wouldn't survive very long outside."

In the wild, royal pythons are found in West and Central Africa where they live in grasslands and forests (Credit: RSPCA)
In the wild, royal pythons are found in West and Central Africa where they live in grasslands and forests (Credit: RSPCA)

BeastWatch UK are appealing for anyone in the area who may know the owner to come forward.

Many of the snakes that the RSPCA's officers are called to collect are thought to be escaped pets.

The RSPCA recommend owners invest in an enclosure suitable for the particular species and that the enclosure is kept secure and locked if necessary when unattended to prevent accidental escape.

RSPCA also suggest that owners ask their vet to microchip their snakes so that snakes can be easily reunited if lost and found.

In the wild, royal pythons are found in West and Central Africa where they live in grasslands and forests.

Topics: RSPCA, Life News, News, Life, Wildlife, Animals

Gregory Robinson
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