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​Indian Rhino Born At British Safari Park For First Time In Its 47 Year History

​Indian Rhino Born At British Safari Park For First Time In Its 47 Year History

In cute news we definitely need to hear on a Sunday, an Indian rhino has been born in a British safari park for the first time in its 47-year history.

The unnamed male was born on Tuesday, September 8, at the West Midland Safari Park, and is said to be doing well.

Rhino parents Seto and Rap have been at the safari park since they were young and mum Seto and the new rhino are now recuperating in a private area within the safari park, where they are "bonding well together". Aww, you guys!

Mum Seto and the new Indian rhino calf are said to be
Mum Seto and the new Indian rhino calf are said to be "bonding well together" (Credit: West Midland Safari Park)
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Shelley Tudor, deputy head keeper of ungulates - that's hoofed animals to you and I - said: "We are absolutely delighted and have been waiting a long time for this moment. After holding this species of rhino for over ten years, this is our first calf to be born at the Park.

"We acquired Seto and Rap as youngsters and have been able to watch them grow and mature over time; which makes it even more momentous to see them produce their own calf."

The unnamed Indian rhino calf (Credit: West Midland Safari Park)
The unnamed Indian rhino calf (Credit: West Midland Safari Park)

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And Shelley said of the new calf: "He is a very special addition to the Asian rhino House, and we look forward to watching him develop, and maybe go on to produce his own little rhinos in the future."

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We hope so too!

The new rhino is the first to be born in the safari park in its 47-year history (Credit: West Midland Safari Park)
The new rhino is the first to be born in the safari park in its 47-year history (Credit: West Midland Safari Park)

The Indian rhino is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List, as populations are fragmented and restricted to less than 7,700 square miles. But numbers are now slowly increasing and, with efforts such as this made by the West Midland Safari Park, it seems that more rhinos could be on the way soon.

Let's hope we hear the pitter patter of more tiny rhino feet at the safari park in the not-too-distant future!

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In the meantime, we wish the calf and his parents all the best!

Featured Image Credit: West Midland Safari Park

Topics: Awesome, Animals

Aneira Davies

Aneira Davies is a freelance lifestyle journalist with a particular interest in interiors and craft. She has written for the Evening Standard, Prima, House Beautiful and Good Housekeeping.