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Tokyo Olympics: Team GB’s First Black Female Swimmer Alice Dearing Breaks Down In Emotional Interview

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Tokyo Olympics: Team GB’s First Black Female Swimmer Alice Dearing Breaks Down In Emotional Interview

Team GB's Alice Dearing broke down in a powerful video from the Tokyo Olympics as she talked of how she hoped she would "make a difference" as the UK's first black female swimmer.

Watch a clip of her emotional interview below:

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Speaking after finishing 19th in the women's 10km marathon swim, the 24-year-old emotionally said: "Don't let anyone tell you [swimming is] not for you".

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"| really hope that people look at this and think 'it is doable'," she said. "It's doable for anybody out there.

"It's tough and it's hard but if you wanna learn to swim 25 metres or you wanna swim in the Olympics, I just want people to know it's open and available to everybody."

Addressing anybody who may need some inspiration to take the first jump, she added in an interview with BBC Sports: "Just go and give it your best shot".

Alice was emotional after finishing in 19th place (Credit: PA)
Alice was emotional after finishing in 19th place (Credit: PA)
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On her positioning in the race, a visibly teary Alice added: "I'm really disappointed with that I’m not going to lie.

"I can do so much better than that and i just put a lot of work in the past four years to even get here so… I just… i can’t redo what I’ve got in there but its only three years to Paris, and Ive got a lot more to give and a lot more to learn - this is my first Olympics - so I’m definitely not done.

"I'll just go home, take my time, get over it and come back stronger next year and the year after."

Alice is the first black female swimmer for the UK (Credit: PA)
Alice is the first black female swimmer for the UK (Credit: PA)
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Despite Alice's disappointment at her ranking, she has a lot to be proud of, namely the fact she'll be an inspiration for millions around the world, as the UK's first black female swimmer in the Olympics.

She nearly quit the sport four years ago, after losing her funding and her place at the National Centre.

But she powered through and made it to the Olympics after some soul searching and a lot of perseverance.

Before her, black male swimmers Kevin Burns (Montreal 1976) and Paul Marshall (Moscow 1980) have also made history.

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And about time, too!

Featured Image Credit: BBC

Topics: News, Life

Joanna Freedman
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