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Etiquette Expert Finally Ends Tea And Dinner Debate

Etiquette Expert Finally Ends Tea And Dinner Debate

What are the meals eaten at midday and in the evening called? Think carefully before you answer. Your response probably has a lot to do with where you grew up and where you currently live. But an etiquette expert has weighed in to end the 'dinner and tea, lunch and dinner, lunch and tea' debate once and for all.

German etiquette expert William Hanson revealed the correct terms for the meals in an interview with the Sun: "The correct order of meals is breakfast, lunch or luncheon as it is technically called, and then dinner."

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Credit: Instagram/William Hanson
Credit: Instagram/William Hanson

William went on to explain that 'tea' is the meal or snack you would have between your midday and evening feeds - think afternoon tea. And yes, it involves the beverage.

People from both sides of the argument have taken to Twitter to share their (weirdly) strong views on the matter.

UM Bongo did a Twitter poll to gage public opinion and seemed to confirm what William said.

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Southerners felt truly vindicated: "Well absolutely! What else would you call them??"

Northerners were quick to point out that school children have school dinners as their midday meal and Christmas dinner is traditionally eaten at midday.

One person tweeted: "Breakfast, dinner and tea. Southerners, man."

Credit: Unsplash
Credit: Unsplash

The Midlands contingent sat on the fence somewhat: "If it's hot it's dinner otherwise it's tea or lunch #midlandsthing."

Others were just confused by the whole thing: "Lunch and either dinner or tea - the debate is making my brain mushed up."

And the correct term for food eaten post-dinner? William confirms that it's supper.

Credit: Unsplash
Credit: Unsplash

He explained: "Then came supper historically and that was a light snack before you went to bed, maybe after the opera or theatre.

"We all know now that we aren't supposed to eat so close to bedroom, so supper has sort of died a death.

"Now supper means an informal dinner, so if I said 'come over for supper,' you'd know not to put on your tiara and finest ball gown, whereas if I said 'come over for dinner', you'd know the affair was going to be a little fancier."

So there you have it, sorted (sort of). What do you call your meals?

Featured Image Credit: Unsplash

Topics: News, Life News, Really?, You, Community, advice

Amelia Jones

Amelia is a freelance journalist and editor specialising in beauty, health, fitness and lifestyle. She has previously worked for titles including Women's Health, Cosmopolitan, Stylist, Red and the Mail on Sunday.

 

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