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Company Says Its Profits Has Soared Since It Started Giving Employees Friday Afternoon Off

Company Says Its Profits Has Soared Since It Started Giving Employees Friday Afternoon Off

Like there wasn't already a huge case for having a shorter working week, one company has just proved it could actually increase productivity.

Three months ago, forward-thinking recruitment firm ISL Recruitment introduced a scheme which allowed workers to take Friday afternoons off - and incredibly they've seen a 41 per cent increase in income since the change.

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The Bristol-based business introduced the incentive back in September, which allowed employees to clock off at 12pm, granted they'd hit their targets for that week.

ISL Recruitment director Alan Furley has seen amazing changes in his company since the incentive began (Credit: SWNS)
ISL Recruitment director Alan Furley has seen amazing changes in his company since the incentive began (Credit: SWNS)

"It was a bit of a shock how successful the incentive was," said director Alan Furley.

"I think it's worked so well because it's a clear short-term goal, which we can collaborate on achieving and was agreed across the office.

"It's been set at the sweet spot between stretch and achievable, typically 150 per cent of budget.

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Shorter working weeks could be the key to better productivity (Credit: Unsplash)
Shorter working weeks could be the key to better productivity (Credit: Unsplash)

ISL's 30-strong recruitment team has hit target five weeks out of the 12 and the firm has also seen a 38 per cent rise in clients' hiring.

The boss added: "The atmosphere in the office seems much more positive.

"There is constant talk about what each other has going on, with greater appetite to help each other. It's encouraged risk taking and innovation."

Employees use their free Friday afternoons to go the pub, go golfing, for walks, picking children up from school and napping (Credit: Pexels)
Employees use their free Friday afternoons to go the pub, go golfing, for walks, picking children up from school and napping (Credit: Pexels)

He added: "The team is using the time off in various ways, including going to the pub, golfing, going for walks, picking children up from school and napping."

Similarly, this summer Microsoft tested out four-day working weeks in its Japan offices and the results were equally as amazing.

Microsoft in Japan trialled a four-day week in August with incredible results (Credit: PA)
Microsoft in Japan trialled a four-day week in August with incredible results (Credit: PA)

The shorter weeks boosted productivity by a massive 40 per cent. In addition, employees took 25 per cent less time off during the trail, electricity use was down 23 per cent, employees printed 59 per cent fewer pages of paper, and 92 per cent of staff said they liked the shorter week.

"Work a short time, rest well and learn a lot," Microsoft Japan president and CEO Takuya Hirano said in a statement.

"I want employees to think about and experience how they can achieve the same results with 20 per cent less working time."

Well, if that's not a reason to demand half days on Friday, we don't know what is.

*Conveniently leaves article on boss's desk.*

Featured Image Credit: SWNS

Topics: Life News, Real, Health

Ciara Sheppard

Ciara is a freelance writer working for Tyla. After graduating with an English Lit and Media degree from the University of Sussex, Ciara held jobs at GLAMOUR and Yahoo Style before packing up for a solo travelling trip around South America. In between writing, Ciara daydreams of being back on the Copacabana drinking caipirinhas.

 

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