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Seven Second Test To Check If It's Too Hot For Your Dog To Go On A Walk

Seven Second Test To Check If It's Too Hot For Your Dog To Go On A Walk

With temperatures due to reach up to 35 degrees this week, things are bound to get uncomfortably hot. Luckily for us, if we feel too hot we can easily express it - but our dogs can't.

In fact, heatwaves like this can be deadly for our dogs. Unable to sweat through their skin like us, our pooches can only sweat through their paws. Couple this with a fur coat and you can understand why our four-legged friends are prone to overheating.

One dog who felt this recently was American Bulldog Finlay, who was left fighting for his life after getting heatstroke after his owner took him to a park in Glasgow. Finlay has luckily recovered, but surprising nature of his heatstroke - the fact he was in an outdoor park - has sparked warnings from animal charities.

If you aren't sure whether its too hot to take your dog out, there's a simple test you can do - and it takes just seven seconds.

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Credit: Pexels
Credit: Pexels

As we know, tarmac and pavements can get very hot during summer. Dog's Trust advise simply to try and hold your hand on a pavement that's in the sun for seven seconds. If you can't it'll be too hot for your dog, too, and will burn their paws.

There are also a few more easy tips you can take to ensure you dog doesn't over heat in this week's hot weather.

Walk early or late. Avoid taking your dog out in the day's hottest hours (from noon until 4pm); instead, walk your dog in the morning or late in the evening when temperatures are at their coolest.

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Plan a shady route. If you know your dog walks are usually sun-soaked, plan an alternate route with plenty of places to stop in the shade. Plus, also remember to bring water.

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Switch up your exercises. Particularly if your dog has breathing difficulties or is overweight, it might be worth considering pausing on your normal walk during summer's hottest times.

Instead, why not try indoor circuits, or playtime in a cool shaded areas such as your garden? You could even try giving your dog two or three short 10 minute walks throughout the day, as opposed to a long one.

Credit: Pexels
Credit: Pexels
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Avoid long journeys. If you're setting off for a long car journey with you dog, make sure you bring blinds for your car and plenty of water for your dog to drink. It's best to avoid long journeys altogether if you can.

Signs your dog has become overheated include panting heavily, dribbling, wobbling, collapsing, vomiting and having bright red gums.

If your worried your dog is suffering from heatstroke the best thing you can do is help take their body temperature down, but this must not be done too quickly to avoid them going into shock.

Dog's Trust advise first taking them to a cool, shaded area. Next, begin slowly pouring room temperature water over their body, and feed them small amount of water at a time.

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Once their breathing is settled, call your nearest very to have your dog assessed.

Featured Image Credit: Pexels

Topics: Life News, Summer, Pets, Life

Ciara Sheppard

Ciara is a freelance journalist working for Tyla. After graduating from the University of Sussex, Ciara worked as a writer at GLAMOUR Magazine and later as the Assistant Editor of Yahoo Style UK.