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There's Going To Be A Full Corn Moon Visible This Week

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There's Going To Be A Full Corn Moon Visible This Week

Time to get the crystals out to charge, because there's going to be a full Corn Moon this week.

Yep, if you look out at the sky on Wednesday September 2nd at 6.22am (GMT) you may see the full moon in all its glory.

NASA explain: "The next full Moon will peak after midnight on Wednesday morning, Sept. 2, 2020, appearing "opposite" the Sun (in Earth-based longitude) at 1:22 a.m. EDT.

"The Moon will appear full for about three days around this time, from Monday evening through Thursday morning."

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A full moon occurs every 29.5 days, and they're caused when the Moon is completely lit up by the Sun's rays. But the Corn Moon is special, because it doesn't occur every year.

Keep an eye out for the moon on Wednesday (Credit: Unsplash)
Keep an eye out for the moon on Wednesday (Credit: Unsplash)

Normally, we only have 12 full moons a year, with the full moon in September being the Harvest Moon.

But this year, because it falls earlier than normal, we have 13, and September's is instead named the Corn Moon.

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This is because, according to the Farmers' Almanac, the Harvest Moon is the one closest to the autumnal equinox on the first day of autumn - September 22nd.

The Harvest Moon will therefore be on October 1st, and the September moon will take on a new name.

There will be a second full moon in October, too - named the Blue Hunter's Moon.

You can expect that to rock up on Halloween.

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We usually have a harvest moon in September (Credit: PA)
We usually have a harvest moon in September (Credit: PA)

The names for the moons were coined by the early Native Americans, who branded each one with a different moniker associated with an event or activity they were doing at that time of year, so they could keep track of the seasons.

Corn Moon was dubbed by the Algonquin tribes, as it reflects the time for gathering staple crops of corn, wild rice, pumpkins, squash and beans.

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European tribes also typically call this early full Moon a Fruit Moon, as it signals the fruits ripening at the end of Summer, and the Barley Moon, due to the "harvesting and threshing of the barley".

We'll sure be keeping an eye out for this one.

Featured Image Credit: PA

Topics: Life News, Astrology, Life

Joanna Freedman
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