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Experts Warn Against Feeding Your Dog Leftover Christmas Dinner

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Experts Warn Against Feeding Your Dog Leftover Christmas Dinner

Experts have warned against giving your dog any food left over from your Christmas dinner this year, as it could make them seriously ill.

Some of the most dangerous food for pooches include chocolate, raisins and currants, as well as nuts and meats; all foods we're likely to indulge in over the festive period.

Tyla spoke to experts at Burgess Pet Care, who explained that festive food can be dangerous for dogs and can lead to vomiting and diarrhoea and, in some cases, seizures.

Read on for the full list of foods to avoid feeding your pup...
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Leftover Christmas dinner can be dangerous for pets, say experts (Credit: Unsplash)
Leftover Christmas dinner can be dangerous for pets, say experts (Credit: Unsplash)
  • Turkey skin
  • Pigs-in-blankets
  • Oysters and fish
  • Leftover cooked meat
  • Gravy, seasoning such as herbs
  • Nuts
  • Turkey or chicken bones
  • Stuffing and nut roasts
  • Raisins and currants
  • Mince pies
  • Christmas cake or Christmas pudding
  • Chocolate

Some elements of our Christmas dinner, such as turkey skin or pigs-in-blankets, can be too salty or fatty for pets to digest and, as such, can lead to severe stomach upsets or more serious conditions such as pancreatitis. So, no matter how yummy we find them, it's important to keep our pets away from these foods at Christmas.

Seafood starters such as oysters or fish, must be avoided at all costs, say experts, while giving pets leftover cooked meat is not recommended either.

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Dr Suzanne Moyer, Burgess Pet Care's in-house vet, advises: "The meat may have been cooked with gravy, seasoning, nuts and herbs - which can be poisonous to pets, causing tremors, seizures and damage to the central nervous system.

Turkey or chicken skin can be too salty or fatty for pets to digest (Credit: Unsplash)
Turkey or chicken skin can be too salty or fatty for pets to digest (Credit: Unsplash)

"This includes pigs in blankets which are high in fat and salt so not suitable for your dogs, cats or other pets.''

Likewise, giving turkey or chicken bones to pets at any time of the year can splinter and cause serious problems for our furry friends.

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Veggies should also take care with their pets this Christmas too, as nut roast isn't safe for our pets either.

Dr Moyer says: "Stuffing and nut roasts contain seasoning such as garlic and onion, and nuts which contain toxins that affect multiple systems in the body, causing shock and can be fatal."

Avoid feeding your pets leftover Christmas food, say experts (Credit: Unsplash)
Avoid feeding your pets leftover Christmas food, say experts (Credit: Unsplash)

And, while we may love a sweet treat after our main course, leftover Christmas pudding, Christmas cake and mince pies can all be dangerous to pets.

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"Raisins and currants are also toxic for dogs and cats, so make sure not to feed your pet mince pies, Christmas cake or Christmas pudding," says Dr Karlien Heyrman of Pets at Home.

Owners are also urged to be careful with edible decorations and chocolate gifts under the tree. Chocolate can be toxic for dogs, cats and other pets, say experts, so keep your pets away from them.

Dr Karlien adds: "Many pet owners are unaware that some of our favourite Christmas foods such as chocolate, raisins or currants, nuts and meats can be extremely toxic or dangerous for our furry friends."

Dr Moyes adds: "Chocolate contains theobromine and caffeine, which can be toxic for dogs and cats as it affects their heart and nervous system. The theobromine is also toxic to small animals, so remember to keep foods like chocolate boxes, tubs and desserts away from your pets."

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Chocolate can be poisonous for both dogs and cats (Credit: Unsplash)
Chocolate can be poisonous for both dogs and cats (Credit: Unsplash)

She adds: "Hidden dried fruit, sultanas, currants, raisins and nuts in our favourite festive foods, such as Christmas pudding, cake and mince pies, can be toxic and cause fatal kidney problems for dogs.

"Nut packets that contain macadamia nuts have an unknown toxin, which can affect the digestive and nervous systems, as well as the muscles in all pets. Nuts are also high in fat, not in fibre, so are difficult for our small animals to digest.''

And, while we may want to treat our pooches this Christmas, there are plenty of pet-friendly treats you can give them instead, says Pets at Home.

Dr Heyrman adds: "They don't have to miss out though as there are plenty of tasty and festive pet friendly treats available for them to enjoy over the holiday season instead."

We'll be stocking up on pet-friendly treats asap.

Featured Image Credit: Unsplash

Topics: Christmas, Pets, Food And Drink, Cats, Dogs

Aneira Davies
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