Tyla

To make sure you never miss out on your favourite NEW stories, we're happy to send you some reminders

Click 'OK' then 'Allow' to enable notifications

Not now
OK
Advert

Disabled Woman Urges Pub Goers To Be More Considerate Of Wheelchair Users While Drinking On The Pavements

Published 
| Last updated 

Disabled Woman Urges Pub Goers To Be More Considerate Of Wheelchair Users While Drinking On The Pavements

A disability activist is urging pub goers to be more considerate of wheelchair users when drinking on the pavement.

Wheelchair user Katie Pennick took to Twitter to explain that she often finds herself stranded on pavements and unable to get around pavement drinkers - and urged cafés, bars and pubs to limit outdoor seating in order to help wheelchair users.

Katie is urging pubs and bars to be considerate of wheelchair users (Credit: Kennedy News and Media)
Katie is urging pubs and bars to be considerate of wheelchair users (Credit: Kennedy News and Media)

Katie also shared photos of herself trying to navigate crowded London streets in her wheelchair, now that pubs have opened to outdoor drinkers, showing that she was effectively blocked in.

Advert
Credit: Twitter/Katie Pennick
Credit: Twitter/Katie Pennick

She Tweeted: "I popped down to Soho today. An already notoriously difficult area (for its lack of dropped kerbs) has been made trickier with outdoor seating blocking pavements.

"I support the hospitality sector and understand the need for outdoor seats, but please leave room for wheelies!"

Katie then added a second Tweet, commenting: "Also... how is there still a lack of dropped kerbs?"

Advert

"We've just spent a year widening pavements and plonking down asphalt here, there and everywhere - how are there still kerbs that are not dropped?

"Can someone explain this to me please, am I missing something?"

Credit: Twitter/Katie Pennick
Credit: Twitter/Katie Pennick

Others Tweeted that they too had found the same problem, with some users commenting that they didn't like going to London because of this reason.

Advert

"One thing I hate about London is this problem," wrote one. "One of the biggest cinemas in Leicester Square had no way of getting us with the wheelchair. One of the biggest cinemas in Leicester Square had no way of getting us with the wheelchair."

"Their business shouldn't come at the expense of disabled people," said another. "Outdoor seating can be possible whilst leaving room for disabled access, they just didn't think of disabled people's access when arranging this. Business and access can both be achieved with a little thought."

Katie shared images of her being blocked in by pub goers (Credit: Kennedy News and Media)
Katie shared images of her being blocked in by pub goers (Credit: Kennedy News and Media)

While a third pointed out that it wasn't just wheelchair users who faced not being able to pass on the street:

Advert

"It's not only wheelchair users who have problems. People with prams, and blind and partially sighted people also find pavement furniture difficult to negotiate. Asking people to move can be met with aggression."

Sadly, Katie's Tweets were met with come unsupportive comments too, claiming she was 'entitled and complaining about nothing' but others were quick to defend her.

Disability groups have echoed Katie's call for action, with charity Scope claiming that streets were becoming 'impossible' for wheelchair users.

Alison Kerry, head of communications at Scope, said: "It is concerning to find, once again, the post lockdown world seems to be locking out many disabled people.

Advert

"Soho streets are particularly narrow and can be challenging for wheelchair and mobility scooter users to negotiate at the best of times.

"Now these streets are becoming impossible for them to navigate at all, in some places."

Others were in support of Katie's call for action (Credit: Twitter)
Others were in support of Katie's call for action (Credit: Twitter)

She added: "We understand that people want to get out, meet their friends, enjoy eating and drinking in one of Soho's many fantastic bars and restaurants, but this should not be at the expense of disabled people.

"We cannot allow disabled people to be forgotten."

Fara Muneer, head of business development at Centre for Accessible Environments, added: "Many of the post-Covid plans are being introduced without clear consideration of disabled people, particularly when it comes to space allowances and new obstacles in the way for people with mobility difficulties.

"As we exit lockdown, local authorities and businesses need to consider everyone in our society and ensure the new normal is inclusive and accessible."

Featured Image Credit: Kennedy News and Media

Topics: Life News, News, Life

Aneira Davies
More like this
Advert
Advert
Advert

Chosen for YouChosen for You

Celebrity

Jaw-dropping Wagatha Christie details revealed in unseen court documents

3 days ago

Most Read StoriesMost Read

Woman from South Korea spent £50,000 to look like Kim Kardashian

17 hours ago