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Charities Share Urgent Warning About Leaving Dogs In Cars

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Charities Share Urgent Warning About Leaving Dogs In Cars

Pet charities including The Kennel Club and the RSPCA have issued warnings to dog owners of the dangers of leaving their pets in hot cars during the UK's heatwave.

One of the downsides that comes with hot weather is the number of people that leave their beloved pets in the car.

In 2018, a campaign called Dogs Die in Hot Cars was launched and the British Veterinary Association (BVA) published data which showed that 26 per cent of vets surveyed who had seen cases of dogs requiring treatment for heat-related conditions over the summer, said at least one of these was a dog who had been affected by being left in a car.

Several pet charities have formed a coalition to warn owners about the dangers of leaving dogs in hot cars (Credit: Unsplash)
Several pet charities have formed a coalition to warn owners about the dangers of leaving dogs in hot cars (Credit: Unsplash)
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The survey also found that almost one in seven vets had seen a dog coming into their practice suffering as a result of being left in a car. One vet surveyed by the BVA said they'd dealt with a case in which a dog had died from heatstroke in the back of his owner's vehicle.

Despite the shocking figures, owners are still leaving their dogs in hot cars. This year the Dogs Die in Hot Cars coalition group has launched a 'doggy lockdown' during heatwaves this summer, in a bid to keep them safe as the weather hots up.

Dogs can get heat stroke if left alone in a hot car without ventilation (Credit: Unsplash)
Dogs can get heat stroke if left alone in a hot car without ventilation (Credit: Unsplash)

The Dogs Die in Hot Cars coalition group is made up of Battersea Dogs & Cats Home, Blue Cross, The British Parking Association, British Veterinary Association (BVA), Dogs Trust, The Kennel Club, Mayhew, National Animal Welfare Trust, The National Police Chiefs Council (NPCC), PDSA, RSPCA, Scottish SPCA, TeamOtis-UK and Wood Green, The Animals Charity.

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RSPCA dog welfare expert Dr Samantha Gaines said: "We hope the campaign will remind owners that our pets may need a helping hand to stay safe, happy, comfortable and cool during the warm summer months.

"We know families love their pets and want to keep them close but, sometimes, it may be safer to leave your four-legged friends at home. Dogs can suffer from heatstroke during hot weather and this can be extremely dangerous, and even prove fatal.

"We're calling on pet owners to put the welfare of their dogs first this summer. If you're heading out and about then consider whether your pet may be happier in the cool at home, only walk them during the cooler hours of the day, and never leave your dog in a car unattended on a warm day."

A spokesperson for The Kennel Club told Tyla owners should never leave their dogs in the car by themselves and to make sure drivers make regular stops to ensure the dog has access to water.

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RSPCA dog welfare expert Dr Samantha Gaines said it is sometimes safer to leave your pooch at home (Credit: Unsplash)
RSPCA dog welfare expert Dr Samantha Gaines said it is sometimes safer to leave your pooch at home (Credit: Unsplash)

"It's getting warmer and whilst we might be enjoying the sunshine, it's important for owners to remember that dogs aren't as good at dealing with hot weather as we are," commented Nick Sutton, health expert at The Kennel Club.

"Knowing the signs of heatstroke and getting your dog to the vets early if they are affected can drastically improve their chance of survival. Particularly on hot days, owners should watch out for heavy panting, tiredness or an unwillingness to move as well as dribbling, sickness and signs of upset stomach.

"If you think your dog has heatstroke it's vital that you take them to the vets and gradually cool them down along the way using water on their skin and fur."

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You can find out more about the dangers of leaving dogs in hot cars and what to do if you think your dog is suffering from heatstroke on the RSPCA's website.

Featured Image Credit: Unsplash

Topics: Weather, Pets, Life

Gregory Robinson
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