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New Research Proves We Aren’t Genetically Suited To 9am Starts

New Research Proves We Aren’t Genetically Suited To 9am Starts

We've all been that guy sat at work at 9am on a Monday morning, half asleep and snoozing at the desk. You think at the time, 'surely this is too early for any human to properly function?' And guess what? Scientists think you're right.

New research from consumer genetics company 23andMe has shown that the average Brit isn't genetically predisposed to wake up in time to start working at 9am, meaning we're unlikely to be productive when we arrive at our desks.

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The early rise could also impact our health too, as it means we're setting alarms ahead of when our body intends us to wake.

Your 9am shift could be messing up your sleeping pattern (Credit: Shutterstock)
Your 9am shift could be messing up your sleeping pattern (Credit: Shutterstock)

The company found that the average Brit's genetic wake-up time is actually 7.55am, meaning that with a typical commute of an hour, there's very little time to get up, get ready and be alert for the start of your shift.

Working in collaboration with sleep expert Dr Neil Stanley, the new research warns that setting an alarm for your 9-5 could risk upsetting your circadian rhythm and minimises your chances of waking up in REM sleep - which is the optimal physiological state to transition from sleep to waking.

It adds that the only age group who naturally have a compatible sleep rhythm that suits the 9-5 daily grind are those over 60, who are genetically predisposed to rise at around 6.45am.

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Those in their 50s are pushed to be up and alert by 9am, though, as they naturally wake at 7.22am, while those in their 40s wake at 7.50am.

People in their 30s have even less luck, genetically rising at 8.19am, while those in their 20s might as well give up on a healthy sleep pattern if they work a 9-5, as their genetic wake up time is 8.47am, just ten minutes before they're supposed to be cracking on with their day.

Is your early wake up time making you less productive? (Credit: Unsplash)
Is your early wake up time making you less productive? (Credit: Unsplash)

And it looks like these un-natural wake-ups are taking their toll, too.

The same genetics company found that overall, Brits admit to working on "autopilot" for three out of five working days, and waste an average of one hour and 22 minutes a day as a result of feeling tired.

Despite our obvious need for some extra zzz's, unfortunately, almost a third of Brits say there is no flexibility in their workplace (32 per cent), and 46 per cent believe their overall health would benefit if they weren't doing 9-5's.

But how can you convince your boss to make the change?

Well, you could try telling them that of those studied who reported to being able to work more flexible hours, 63 per cent feel happier, 60 per cent are more refreshed and a further 60 per cent admit to being more productive.

Sounds like a pretty strong argument for a lie in, if you ask us.

Featured Image Credit: Pexels

Topics: Work, Life News, News, Sleep, Health

Joanna Freedman

Joanna is a journalist at Tyla with a particular interest in highlighting women's issues and telling inspiring first person stories. She's also their resident foodie, and loves covering exciting new beauty launches, too. Contact her at [email protected]

 

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