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People Are Outraged At This New Proposed Weight Loss Device

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People Are Outraged At This New Proposed Weight Loss Device

People are less than impressed with a new weight loss device which is in the works at the University Of Otago.

The university shared a picture of their new device on Twitter, writing: "Otago and UK researchers have developed a world-first weight-loss device to help fight the global obesity epidemic: an intra-oral device that restricts a person to a liquid diet."

The image showed a magnetic teeth clamp, which prevented people from being able to chew so they had no choice but to consume a liquid diet while losing weight urgently, for operations and the like.

And the link they provided alongside the tweet further explained exactly how it works.

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Many aren't sold on this new weight loss device (Credit: Twitter)
Many aren't sold on this new weight loss device (Credit: Twitter)

The device, known as DentalSlim Diet Control, is described as "an intra-oral device fitted by a dental professional to the upper and lower back teeth.

"It uses magnetic devices with unique custom-manufactured locking bolts. It allows the wearer to open their mouths only about 2mm, restricting them to a liquid diet, but it allows free speech and doesn't restrict breathing."

What more could you want, eh?

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So far, a trial has taken place in New Zealand's Dunedin, in which the researchers boast participants lost an average of 6.36kg in two weeks.

But some people likened it to a "torture device," and said that such methods of weight loss were simply inhumane.

Credit: Twitter
Credit: Twitter
Credit: Twitter
Credit: Twitter
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Credit: Twitter
Credit: Twitter

"It's f*cking sickening that in 2021 someone would think it's okay to do this. That a whole bunch of people thought this was a good idea?!," wrote one woman in response to the image.

While another Twitter user responded: "A world-first and world-last, I sincerely hope. This is a torture device and you should be embarrassed to be promoting it, let alone to be associated with it."

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A third penned: "This is violent. Even if this is deemed an acceptable medical treatment, the rampant and blatent fatphobia in medicine guarantees that this will be utilized in the worst way possible.

"I've been blessed in my life to have best combo of people helping me on my weight loss journey but this is a hellscape for those that aren't as fortunate.

"I say this as someone whose doctor had them on the wrong insulin for 2 1/2 years but chastised me every time I saw him because I wasn't losing weight fast enough."

Credit: Twitter
Credit: Twitter
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Credit: Twitter
Credit: Twitter

"They literally want to wire people's mouths shut to avoid gaining weight and people are still questioning if fatphobia exists?," said somebody else.

"Y'all are creepy, get help, please acquire a sense of shame," a fifth wrote.

In the past, wiring jaws shut was used to aid weight loss, but now it is widely frowned upon due to the ethics around it.

As the University Of Otago's study states, itself, the process brought around adverse reactions including vomiting, risk of choking, possible gum disease. In some cases, there was also "continuing issues with restriction of jaw movement" and "acute psychiatric conditions".

The new process is being dubbed more ethical because people can still speak and can undo the magnets in an emergency - but despite this, many are still disgusted.

Professor Paul Brunton, lead researcher on the teeth clamp (Credit: University Of Otago)
Professor Paul Brunton, lead researcher on the teeth clamp (Credit: University Of Otago)

In two further tweets, the university added: "To clarify, the intention of the device is not intended as a quick or long-term weight-loss tool; rather it is aimed to assist people who need to undergo surgery and who cannot have the surgery until they have lost weight.

"After two or three weeks they can have the magnets disengaged and device removed. They could then have a period with a less restricted diet and then go back into treatment. This would allow for a phased approach to weight loss supported by advice from a dietician."

Topics: Life News, Health

Joanna Freedman
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