Advert

Latest

an hour ago
Advert
an hour ago
Advert

Most Popular

5 hours ago
Advert

Here's How To Get Rid Of Chicken Skin AKA Those Annoying Bumps On The Back Of Your Arms

Here's How To Get Rid Of Chicken Skin AKA Those Annoying Bumps On The Back Of Your Arms

Keratosis Pilaris is one of the most common skin conditions, affecting roughly 40 per cent of adults and even more adolescents, but you probably know it better as 'chicken skin'.

Chicken skin is a disorder of follicles causing a buildup of dead skin cells that leads to small bumps appearing on the surface of the skin - much like the skin of the bird it takes its name from.

Chicken skin is totally harmless and is commonly found on upper outer arms, thighs, buttocks, and occasionally on the cheeks.

Dermatologist Dr. Janet Prystowsky, who has worked with patients with the condition for years, tells PRETTY 52 while there isn't a difference between the sexes in terms of incidence, she believes "it bothers women more than men."

Advert
Credit: Pexels
Credit: Pexels

Chicken skin is hereditary and incurable, though there are steps sufferers can take to prevent the condition looking worse. Many common tips include avoiding perfumed soaps or bath products that could irritate the skin, harsh scrubs and picking and rubbing.

"If the plugged follicles get irritated with pressure and sweating, which commonly occurs if the buttocks are involved, then follicles can get inflamed and resemble acne," says Dr. Prystowsky. "Picking at the rough follicles always makes the problem worse, too."

More Like ThisMore Like This

1 of 6
Health

If Your Skin Is Worse Than Usual ATM - It Could Be Your Central Heating

There are also steps you can take to improve the condition, such as using unperfumed bathing products, having lukewarm showers and gently patting your skin dry after washing.

Advert
Credit: Pexels
Credit: Pexels
There's A Legit Reason Your Skin Is Worse Than Ever During Lockdown
Health

There's A Legit Reason Your Skin Is Worse Than Ever During Lockdown

published at7 months ago

Dr. Prystowsky says that "microdermabrasion on a regular basis to the affected areas seems to help the condition the best," while topical acne medicines - such as Retin-A, tretinoin, tazarotene, or adapalene - are often prescribed by doctors to clean out pores. She has "never seen great results from them" though, adding "alpha hydroxy acids do not help much either."

She explains that some of her patients have seen results from LIVAD moisturizer which contains Vitamins A, D, and E. "Since redness of the plugged follicles is one of the complaints, it is possible that the Vitamin D in my product helps because it is anti-inflammatory and reduces redness. While the Vitamin A may help decrease the follicular plugging," she says.

Advert

For more information on chicken skin, the NHS list some helpful tips and advice.

Featured Image Credit: Shutterstock

Topics: Beauty, health news, Skin

Chosen for YouChosen for You

MTV Cribs: Caitlyn Jenner Reveals She's 'Always' Worn Makeup As She Opens Up On Going Public With Her Transition
published atan hour ago

Most Read StoriesMost Read

Entertainment

Chilling Adventures Of Sabrina Part Four To Arrive On Netflix On 31st December

published at5 hours ago
Welsh Woman Told She Can't Buy Period Pads At Tesco As They're 'Not Essential'

Ciara Sheppard

Ciara is a freelance journalist working for Tyla. After graduating from the University of Sussex, Ciara worked as a writer at GLAMOUR Magazine and later as the Assistant Editor of Yahoo Style UK.