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Science Says Being Lazy Can Help You Live Longer So Put Your Feet Up

Science Says Being Lazy Can Help You Live Longer So Put Your Feet Up

Forget Darwin's 'survival of the fittest' theory. Research has revealed that 'survival of the laziest' is probably more accurate.

A study carried out by teams from both the University of Kansas in the US and Oxford University here in the UK have revealed that the key to living a long life might be to relax and take a load off more often. As if we need an excuse.

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Credit: Ruby Schmank
Credit: Ruby Schmank

Now, you might not be convinced that a Netflix binge with your feet up as opposed to sweating it daily in a HIIT class is the key to living longer, but hear these scientists out: their fossil data seriously suggests that laziness could lead to a longer lifespan.

According to a report published by the The University of Kansas, while analysing fossilised remains dating back five million years until the present day, researchers focussed on nearly 300 different species' metabolic rates (read: the amount of energy they would need to survive from day to day).

Credit: Toa Heftiba
Credit: Toa Heftiba

Looking at this data, researchers found that the species which required more energy to survive were more likely to die out quickly, while species whose energy levels stayed low were more likely to thrive.

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Credit: rwstudios
Credit: rwstudios

Of course, the findings are 'preliminary' and 'generalised', say the study authors. And while there are clearly benefits to being lazy - being horizontal all the time isn't the answer. Translation: you should probably do some regular, gentle exercise as well as relaxing.

Credit: Brianna Santellan
Credit: Brianna Santellan

Marie Graham, Group Exercise Product Development Manager at David Lloyd Leisure Club advises the following:
"On average, we should be getting 150 minutes of moderate exercise each week. This can be spread out across the seven days or even in 10-minute exercise intervals, perhaps in the morning before Christmas lunch and later in the evening to get the body moving after a few hours slumped on the sofa watching festive films."

But if your used to more exercise founder of @totalbodylondon and Sweaty Betty Ambassador, Chiara Lewis recommends two days of strength training per week combined with 30 minutes of walking per day but it all depends on your current fitness levels.

The takeaway: it's all about balance.

Featured Image Credit: Unsplash/jeshoots.com

Topics: Life, Fitness, Real Life, advice

Amelia Jones

Amelia is a freelance journalist and editor specialising in beauty, health, fitness and lifestyle. She has previously worked for titles including Women's Health, Cosmopolitan, Stylist, Red and the Mail on Sunday.

 

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