Tyla

To make sure you never miss out on your favourite NEW stories, we're happy to send you some reminders

Click 'OK' then 'Allow' to enable notifications

Not now
OK
Advert
Advert

You Should Not Keep Your Fan On All Night During Heatwave, Sleep Expert Warns

Joanna Freedman

Published 
| Last updated 

You Should Not Keep Your Fan On All Night During Heatwave, Sleep Expert Warns

Featured Image Credit: Shutterstock

In the hot weather, it can be tempting to sleep with your fan on all night. In fact, it can often feel like the only way to dose off.

But experts are warning that we really shouldn't be keeping our fans on all night, explaining that doing so actually has many negative health impacts.

The first issue is that sleeping with a fan circulates dust straight at you, as well as pollen. This means that your fan could actually be triggering for those who suffer with allergies or asthma, Sleep Advisor reports.

"Take a close look at your fan," The Sleep Advisor suggests. "If it’s been collecting dust on the blades, those particles are flying through the air every time you turn it on."

Sleeping next to a fan could be bad for you. Credit: Shutterstock
Sleeping next to a fan could be bad for you. Credit: Shutterstock

This isn't the only issue that can occur if you lay by a fan for too long.

The expert adds that people's skin may well suffer, too, because the air blowing at them can dry it out. It can also dry your nasal passages, meaning you wake up feeling like you have a cold, because your body produces excess mucus.

And that's not all, it can also encourage your muscles to stiffen, too.

"This is because the concentrated cool air can make muscles tense up and cramp," the experts explain.

This is a particular issue for those who sleep with a fan right next to their necks.

In case you haven't noticed, this week is set to be a scorcher. In fact, Brits could see the hottest June day in 40 years.

Yep, Netweather predicts that temperatures this week could exceed the previous June record of 35.6C, recorded in London in 1957 and Southampton in 1976.

The meteorological site's forecast read: "Operational forecast runs from the ECMWF [European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts] and GFS [Global Forecast System] are suggesting the potential for record-breaking temperatures of around 35-36C in the south-east.

A dusty fan can cause cold like symptoms (Credit: Shutterstock)
A dusty fan can cause cold like symptoms (Credit: Shutterstock)

"For comparison, the UK record temperature for June is 35.6C, set in Southampton on 28 June 1976 during a famous hot spell.

"However, some forecast runs have the hottest weather not quite making the British Isles, with the south-east just nudging the low 30s Celsius - which would still be hot by most standards, but not record-breaking."

You can read more on that here.

If you do find yourself reaching for the fan, we'd suggest doing so in doses, rather than leaving yours on blast all day and night.

And check out this hack to help you stay cool in bed, instead...

Topics: Health, Weather

Joanna Freedman
More like this

Chosen for YouChosen for You

Entertainment

Love is Blind fans are all saying the same thing about Chelsea's behaviour as she responds to backlash

an hour ago

Most Read StoriesMost Read

Romeo Beckham announces split from girlfriend Mia Regan with statement to fans

5 hours ago