Advert

Latest

a day ago
Advert
a day ago
Advert

Most Popular

a day ago
Advert

David Attenborough's New Show Starts Sunday - Here's Everything We Know

David Attenborough's New Show Starts Sunday - Here's Everything We Know

Fans who've been missing David Attenborough's dulcet tones, needn't be too sad: he's back this Sunday.

Yes, Sundays are back to exactly where they should be thanks to the national treasure's brand new seven-part docuseries, Seven Worlds, One Planet - but it won't necessarily make for easy viewing.

The landmark series - which took 1,500 people more than four years to shoot - is set to look at the world's seven continents, with each episode focusing on a different one and its unique climate, habitats and animals.

Advert

But beyond cute shots of mumma bears and their offspring, there will be a over-arching message about climate change and the desperate state our planet finds itself in.

"You are going to cry - buckets - so you might as well embrace the fact from the outset, and be prepared for a post-screening re-evaluation of every aspect of your life," say Evening Standard - who caught a preview of the first episode - adding: "Cuddly Sunday-night animal fest this is not."

Yikes.

Advert
(Credit: BBC)
(Credit: BBC)

Perhaps this is why BBC One has decided to air the programme at the earlier time of 6.15pm, to give people of all ages the chance to witness the urgent scenes.

The first episode will focus on Antarctica where the ice caps are melting, and the week after that we'll travel to the world's largest continent, Asia, before travelling to Europe, where BBC promise to reveal "surprising wildlife dramas" in our own continent.

The BBC said of the series: "Seven Worlds, One Planet will feature remarkable unseen animal behaviour from all the continents including the baking plains of Africa and the frozen waters off Antarctica."

Advert

More Like ThisMore Like This

1 of 6
(Credit: BBC)
(Credit: BBC)

"Asia, the biggest of all continents, will showcase life at the extremes, whilst Europe will reveal surprising wildlife dramas hidden right alongside us.

"By telling unknown, unseen and unexpected wildlife stories, Seven Worlds, One Planet will uncover the fundamental truth about what makes each one of our seven worlds unique."

One of these 'unseen animals' featured is one David Attenborough has waited 50 years to see.

Advert

At a recent screening of the series, the 91-year mentioned that the greatest treat viewers (and himself alike) will be the golden-haired blue-faced snub-nosed snow monkey.

(Credit: BBC)
(Credit: BBC)

He was hoping to catch sight of rare monkey in China back in the Sixties, but it has taken until this decade for him to clap eyes on the rare breed.

According to The Guardian, 93-year-old David said at a screening for the series: "There's a wonderful creature called the golden-haired blue-faced snub-nosed snow monkey.

Advert

"I'd never seen film of it before. I once read a scientific paper and thought: we must go and film that!

"But that was back in the sixties and we couldn't get to China so in the end I dropped it ... and then, blow me, this lot [BBC] pop up and say 'we've got it'."

(Credit: BBC)
(Credit: BBC)

If Dave's excited, we're excited.

Episode one of Seven Worlds, One Planet airs this Sunday 27th October 2019 at 6.15pm on BBC One.

Featured Image Credit: BBC

Topics: Entertainment News, BBC, TV Entertainment

Ciara Sheppard

Ciara is a freelance journalist working for Tyla. After graduating from the University of Sussex, Ciara worked as a writer at GLAMOUR Magazine and later as the Assistant Editor of Yahoo Style UK.