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Retired Police Officer Andrew Colborn Is Suing Netflix Over Making A Murderer

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Retired Police Officer Andrew Colborn Is Suing Netflix Over Making A Murderer

A copper who featured in Netflix doc Making A Murderer has been given the green light to sue Netflix.

Manitowoc County Sheriff's Office Lt. Andrew Colborn wants damages from the streamer after claiming it led people to think he "framed Steven Avery and Brendan Dassey".

Colborn has now been given the green light by a federal court in Wisconsin to proceed against the filmmakers and Netflix, and sue them for defamation of character.

It comes after the doc presents the defences argument that police may have framed Brendan Dassey and Steven Avery for the rape and murder of Teresa Halbach in 2005.

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When he filed the initial lawsuit in 2018, Colborn's attorney, Michael Griesbach, said: "(Colborn's) reputation and that of Manitowoc County, itself, has been severely and unjustly defamed.

"He is filing this lawsuit to set the record straight and to restore his good name."

Colborn in Making A Murderer (Credit: Netflix)
Colborn in Making A Murderer (Credit: Netflix)

The lawsuit is alleging three counts: defamation, intentional infliction of emotional distress and negligence on the part of the defendants.

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"Neither plaintiff nor any other law enforcement officer planted evidence or in any other way attempted to frame Avery or Dassey for Halbach's murder," the lawsuit states.

Plus, it is calling for a "retraction and honest clarification of the erroneous and false statements and depictions described".

Griesbach added that the Netflix series may have been lucrative and bought in ratings, but it was also "another layer of tragedy to what is already a painful episode for our community".

Colborn helped send Steven Avery to jail (Credit: Netflix)
Colborn helped send Steven Avery to jail (Credit: Netflix)
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The lawsuit will look in particular at Colborn's call to dispatch on November 3rd 2005, and how it was portrayed in the series.

It will also examine the discovery of the key to Halbach's SUV in Avery's bedroom on November 8th 2005, and the 1994 or 1995 telephone call covered in the series which "led viewers to falsely conclude that (Colborn) learned of Avery's 1985 wrongful conviction approximately eight years before he was released, but covered it up".

It will also address "[Making A Murderer's] omission and distortion of material, significant evidence and facts," it is promised.

Colborn said the show had ruined his life (Credit: Netflix)
Colborn said the show had ruined his life (Credit: Netflix)
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Speaking to The Hollywood Reporter, Colborn has previously said he is no longer able to lead a "quiet and private life" because of the show.

"I live in a state of constant vigilance very similar to combat or constantly being on duty as a law enforcement officer," he said.

Responding to Colborn's comments at the time, Avery's lawyer, Kathleen Zellner wrote on Twitter: "Wonder if writer has any conception of the suffering of the wrongly convicted who lose everything including their freedom for years if not lifetimes & have NO immunity as the police do."

Featured Image Credit: Netflix

Topics: True Crime, TV & Film, Steven Avery, Making A Murderer, Netflix

Joanna Freedman
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